Print Page | Contact Us | Your Cart | Sign In | Join
News & Press: Frontpage News

Who's a Minister for IRS Purposes?

Tuesday, February 20, 2018   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Allison King
Share |
Three special tax rules apply to ministers: dual tax status, housing/parsonage allowance, and withholding exemption. These rules operate together. In other words, for a given minister, all of them apply or none of them do. Essentially, the IRS says that to qualify for the ministerial tax provisions, a person needs to be functioning as a minister, serving in a religious context, considered a religious leader, and (quoting IRS language) “ordained, commissioned, or licensed.”

Thus, historically, the Office of Church Staff Finances has regarded *ordination* as the marker of when someone becomes a minister for tax purposes, in keeping with IRS language and with our polity. However, we sometimes heard from those of you who had recently received preliminary fellowship through the UUA: “Are you saying we don’t qualify for the housing allowance (a significant tax benefit) until we get ordained?” With ordination often taking place many months – sometimes well over a year – after fellowshipping, this understandably felt frustrating and unfair. We also learned that some of your accountants said that their credentialed status through our fellowshipping process met the intent of the law. It was time for us to do some homework and provide some clarity.

So, we pored over the trusted Church and Clergy Tax Guide -  http://store.churchlawtodaystore.com/20chcltaxgu.html; and gathered further information from online sources. We consulted with the UUA staff who support our ministerial credentialing process. Our research led us to agree that fellowshipping should qualify a minister for clergy tax provisions, just as ordination does. Ultimately, we brought our evidence to a lawyer with expertise in the intersection of church operations and IRS regulations.   He has affirmed our conclusion that either ordination or fellowshipping satisfies the “ordained, commissioned or licensed” requirement in the faith-based workplace.

Please make sure that those involved with compensation and payroll issues in your congregation are aware of this shift in our interpretation. If you newly recognize that you are eligible for it, do have your leaders designate a housing allowance for 2018 as soon as possible. (The housing allowance only operates prospectively, i.e., the congregation must designate the amount before expenditures can count toward it.) Feel free to contact Rev. Richard Nugent, rnugent@uua.org, or Jan Gartner, jgartner@uua.org, with any questions.

Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association, 24 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1409
© 2016 Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association.