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In Loving Memory of David Johnson (1935-2019)

Posted By Hannah A. Franco-Isaacs, Monday, August 26, 2019
Updated: Friday, September 6, 2019
We offer our condolences to the family and colleagues of the Rev. David A. Johnson, who died on July 22, 2019, at the age of 83.

David was born on October 16, 1935, in Buffalo, NY, to Axel H. Johnson and Glenna B. Johnson. He graduated from Antioch College, OH, in 1958, with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, following which he received his Master of Arts in Philosophy from the University of Illinois in 1961. In 1964, David earned his Bachelor of Divinity from the Meadville Lombard Theological School, IL.

David was welcomed into Preliminary Fellowship on April 14, 1964, and ordained on October 25, 1964, by the Unitarian Society of Cleveland, OH. Following his ordination, he served the UU Church of Bloomington, IN (1964-1970), and then the First Unitarian Church of Pittsburgh, PA (1970-1973). In 1973, Rev. Johnson accepted a call from the UU Church of Tucson, AZ; he ministered there for fifteen years, until 1988. Finally, he fulfilled his parish ministry at the First Parish in Brookline, MA (1988-2003), before his retirement in 2003.

After his retirement, Rev. Johnson was drawn to interim ministry and served as an interim minister at the following congregations: First Unitarian Church in New Bedford, MA (2003-2005); the First Parish UU Church, Bridgewater, MA (2005-2006); the Unitarian Church of Marlborough & Hudson, MA (2006-2007); the UU Meeting House, Chatham, MA (2007-2008); and the First Parish in Plymouth, MA (2008-2010). In 2010, the UU Church of Tucson, AZ, honored him as Minister Emeritus for his meritorious service to the congregation. From 2010 to 2012, Rev. Johnson served the UU Meeting House of Provincetown, MA; and finally, the United First Parish Church, Quincy, MA (2012-2014).

Rev. Johnson’s service on behalf of the denomination was extensive. He was the business manager for the First UU College Conference, Lake Forest, IL (1961); and a member and officer, for the Liberal Religious Scholars Collegium. He served as a chairman for the Ohio Valley UU Congregation (OVUUC) College Centers Committee (1964-1968), Nominating Committee (1966), and Conference (1962); and was a Host Minister in 1966. Thereafter, Rev. Johnson functioned as a member of the Advisory Committee, UUA Division of Education (1967-1969), and Division of Education & S.R. Curriculum Development Committee on UU Identity (1971-1975). He was president for the Alumni Association of the Meadville Lombard Theological School (1972-1974), and an organizer for the International Association of Religious Freedom Native American Conference (1976). From 1980 to 1982, Rev. Johnson worked as a board member for the Pacific Southwest District Board, UUA; and for the UU Support of Sanctuary as a founder and chair (1986).

Beyond his ministry and denominational activities, Rev. Johnson was affiliated with several community organizations. He was officer and committee chair for the American Civil Liberties Union; and President for the Pima Council on Aging and Tucson Interfaith Coalition on Aging. He served as a board member for the Apache Cultural History Foundation; Parents United; and United Way President’s Council. Furthermore, David chaired the Independence Citizens Committee; Tucson Unified School District; and Sanctuary Covenant Churches. In his spare time, he enjoyed skiing, sailing and writing articles on Gerontological Theology, and Universalist and Unitarian History.

David is survived by his wife Julie Coulter; his sons Kirk Johnson, Erik Johnson, and Matthew Johnson; his stepchildren James (Jim) MacDonald, Nancy MacDonald and Darren MacDonald; and his several grandchildren and a step grandchild.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association. Please address the donations to Dave Hunter, Treasurer, 535 Gradyville Road #V-211, Newton Square, PA 19073 with a note “In memory of David A. Johnson” on the memo line.

A celebration of David’s life was held at 2 pm on Thursday, August 1, 2019, at the First Parish of Brookline, 382 Walnut St, Brookline, MA 02445. Notes of condolences may be sent to Julie Coulter at 25 Allen Avenue, North Providence, RI 02911.

Please Note: The UUMA has two members named David A. Johnson. Retired Interim minister, the Rev. Dr. David A. Johnson, continues to reside in Overland Park, Kansas

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In Loving Memory of Oren Peterson (1927-2019)

Posted By Administration, Monday, August 26, 2019
We offer our condolences to the family and colleagues of the Rev. Oren Arthur “Pete” Peterson, who died on June 10, 2019, at the age of 91.

Oren was born on October 11, 1927, in Williamsburg, IA, to Oren Peterson and Myrtle Peterson. He graduated in 1945, from a small-town school system in IA, and joined the Navy aviation cadet program. In 1949, Pete received his Bachelor of Science in pre-med, from the University of Iowa, following which he became a fighter pilot in 1950. In 1955, he was ordered to the Navy Intelligence Postgraduate School in Washington D.C. Thereafter, Pete served for three years as a staff intelligence officer abroad USS Saratoga in the Mediterranean-Atlantic; two years as a Commanding Officer for a carrier airborne warning squadron on an anti-submarine carrier; and six years in Washington D.C., as instructor in the Intelligence School and as an editor briefing officer for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Pentagon. Pete served in the Navy for 21 years, retired in 1968, and then began his training for UU Ministry. In 1971, he earned his Master of Divinity from Harvard Divinity School.

Rev. Peterson was ordained on October 8, 1971, by the Unitarian Society of Germantown, PA, where he carried out his first ministry from 1971 to 1973. In that year, he was called to settled ministry to the First Parish Church UU, Duxbury, MA where he would serve for six years. From 1980 to 1984, Rev. Peterson ministered at the UU Church in Eugene, OR; and at the First Unitarian Church of Honolulu, HI, from 1984 to 1985. He went on to complete further parish ministries at the Emerson UU Church, Canoga Park, CA (1986); and the First Unitarian Church of Des Moines Iowa, IA (1986-1993). Rev. Peterson retired from active ministry in 1993. After his retirement, he served for almost a decade, as an Interim Minister at the following congregations: Hope Unitarian Church, Tulsa, OK (1993-1994); First UU Church of Austin, TX (1994-1995); UU Society, IA (1996-1997); People’s Church, Kalamazoo, MI (1997-1998); the First UU Society in Newton, MA (1998-2000); Beacon UU Congregation in Summit, NJ (2000-2001); and the Starr King UU Fellowship, NH (2001-2002).

Rev. Peterson performed a variety of other roles on behalf of the denomination. He was Vice-President for the Pacific North West District of the UUA. He served the UUMA Executive Committee (1975-1978) and frequently attended the District UUMA programs. Furthermore, Rev. Peterson served the Channing bi-Centennial, the UUA Sesquicentennial and UUA-US bi-Centennial Committees.

Outside of his ministry, Oren was an engaged member of the community. He was on the Program Advisory Committee of Oregon Public Television. He served as an active member of the National Hemlock Society; Planned Parenthood; the American Civil Liberties Union; Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association; and the Experimental Aircraft Association. Pete was also instrumental to help found the Iowa chapter of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. Additionally, he performed as a Chaplain of the Masonic Lodge and was an active Rotary Member in Duxbury, MA.

Oren’s wife Patricia noted, “During the Korean War, Oren’s plane was shot down. He ditched the plane in the Sea of Japan and was rescued by helicopter.”

Oren is survived by his wife of 49 years, Patricia Knight Peterson; his children Thea Peterson, Thomas Peterson, Laura Peterson, and David Peterson; his nine grandchildren Michael, Oren Silas, Nathan, Beth, Rebecca, Anton, Tepper, Stella, and Leonard; and his three great-grandchildren Theo, Raven, and Alva. He was preceded in death by his siblings Adela Engel and Phyllis Murphy; his twin brother Keith Peterson; his sons Oren A. Peterson Jr and Paul Peterson; and his grandson Max.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Planned Parenthood of the Heartland; and to the Good Life Fund at Scottish Rite Park, 2909 Woodland Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50312.

A celebration of Oren’s life was held at 10:30 am on Saturday, August 17, 2019, at the First Unitarian Church of Des Moines, 1800 Bell Ave, Des Moines, IA 50315.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Patricia Peterson at 2909 Woodland Ave Apt 1001, Den Moines, IA 50312.

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In Loving Memory of Judith Walker-Riggs (1939-2019)

Posted By Administration, Monday, August 26, 2019

(Image from UU World)

We offer our condolences to the family and colleagues of the Rev. Judith A. Walker-Riggs, who died on July 8, 2019, at the age of 79.

Judith was born on August 4, 1939, in Baltimore, MD, to Charles and Marjorie Louise Walker. From 1957 to 1958, she studied Comparative Religion at the University of Rochester, NY, following which she earned a Certificate in Theology from Manchester College, Oxford, England, in 1964. Judith also took courses on modern theology at the University of Oxford, while being at Manchester College. On leaving Manchester College, she was given status as a Unitarian Minister. Later, in 1987, Meadville Lombard Theological School, IL awarded her with honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity.

Rev. Walker-Riggs was ordained on June 24, 1964, by the General Assembly of Unitarian Churches, Great Britain. Following her ordination, she served the Cairo Street Unitarian Chapel, Warrington, England for a year. In 1965, she accepted a call from the First Unitarian Church, Reading, England and served the Reading congregation until 1967. From 1968 to 1970, Rev. Walker-Riggs ministered at the First Unitarian Church, Stoneham, MA, and then at the UU Fellowship Brussels, Belgium (1971-1972). In 1972, she was again called to the First Unitarian Church, Stoneham, MA, where she would serve for four years. Thereafter, Rev. Walker-Riggs executed her vital Parish ministry at the following congregations: The Peoples Church UU, Cedar Rapids, IA (1976-1983); Mt. Vernon Unitarian Church, Alexandria, VA (1984-1985); All Souls Unitarian Church, Kansas City, MO (1986-1991); and Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel, London, England (1991-1998).

From 1998 onwards, Rev. Walker-Riggs was drawn to interim ministry and served as an interim minister for the UU Congregation at Shelter Rock, Manhasset, NY (1998-2000); Main Line Unitarian Church, Devon, PA (2000-2001); Fountain Street Church, Grand Rapids, MI (2002-2004); and finally at the UU Community of El Paso, El Paso, TX (2006-2008).

Rev. Walker-Riggs carried out a great deal of services on behalf of the denomination. She functioned as LRY (Liberal Religious Youth) local and Federation officer (1954-1957); and as President for the MBD UUMA (1975-1976). She was actively involved in the UUA Extension Training (1978); and served the UUA Board of Trustees (1981-1989), Ministerial Fellowship Committee (1979-1986), the UU Ministers Association, and the UU Women’s Federation. She chaired the UUA Long-Range Planning Committee (1982-1984); and was a board member for the Governing Body of British Unitarians (1993-1998) and Starr King School for the Ministry. Furthermore, Judith served the British Unitarian Finance and Administration Committee from 1995 to 1998. She was adjunct professor at the Meadville Lombard Theological School and was one of the writers for UUA Kit, “Liberal Religion- Our Mission for the Future”.

In addition to her ministry, Judith belonged to several community organizations. She served on the boards for the League of Women Voters; United Way; Red Cross; Planned Parenthood; Council of Churches; Council on Aging; Emergency shelter; Camden Ecumenical Refugee Network; and many more organizations. She was appointed to the Civil Rights Commission (1979-1983) and the 8th Circuit Court Desegregation Monitoring Committee (1987-1990). She was instrumental in setting legally required Religious Education in Schools for the London Borough of Camden. In her spare time, Judith enjoyed theatre, music, reading, walking, swimming, and crossword puzzles.

Judith’s son James had these thoughts to share in reminiscence of his mother:
The thing I remember the most (and that people often mention first when remembering her services) was her “Freddy the Frog” stories. The way in which they brought children into adult service, and the opportunity for her to use her voice performance skills was legendary.

Personally, her drive for justice in the world around her really affected my brother and me. She was committed to understanding the ways in which UUs could help drive fundamental change. She influenced countless others in her congregations and in the denomination as a whole.

Judith is survived by her sons Iain Urquhart and James Urquhart; and her stepson Steven Riggs.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of one’s own choosing.

A celebration of Judith’s life was held at 10 am on Saturday, July 13, 2019 at the Northwest Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1025 Mt. Vernon Highway NW, Sandy Springs, GA 30327.

Notes of condolences may be sent to James Urquhart at 3208 Fairview Avenue, Alameda, CA 94501.

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In Loving Memory of Carolyn Colbert (1934-2019)

Posted By Administration, Monday, August 26, 2019
We offer our condolences to the family and colleagues of the Rev. Carolyn W. Colbert, who died on June 4, 2019 at the age of 85.

Carolyn was born on May 24, 1934, in Oakland, CA to Horton Richard Colbert and Lynette Colbert. She attended Goddard College, VT from 1952 to 1953, following which she went to the University of California at Northridge (1958-1964). From 1972 until 1975, she worked as an Adjunct Faculty at Starr King School for the Ministry, CA teaching Human Sexuality, Awareness Work, and Adolescent Development. Later, Carolyn applied to Starr King, where she earned her Master of Divinity degree in 1978.

Carolyn was welcomed into Preliminary Fellowship in 1982 and ordained on June 10, 1984, by the Unitarian Church of Davis, CA. From 1982 to 1986, she carried out her ministry as an on-call minister at the San Francisco Unitarian Church. In 1986, she was called to settled ministry by Community UU Church, in Kennewick, WA where she would serve until 1989. Rev. Colbert also served the Cascade UU Fellowship, in Wenatchee, WA as a Consulting Minister from 1987 to 1989. In 1989, she accepted another call to settled ministry from the UU Fellowship in San Luis Obispo, CA and ministered for six years (1989-1995). Henceforth in the decade that followed, Rev. Colbert completed a series of parish ministries at the following congregations: the UU Congregation at Shelter Rock, NY (1995-1996); the UU Church at Washington Crossing, NJ (1996-1997); the UU Church of Fresno, CA (1997-1998); and the UU Church in Eugene, OR (1998-2006). She retired from active ministry in 2006; in the same year the UU Church in Eugene, OR, honored her as their Minister Emerita. After her retirement, Rev. Colbert served as an interim minister for three congregations: the UU Fellowship of Los Gatos, CA (2006-2007); the UU Church in Livermore, CA (2007-2008); and the Rogue Valley UU Fellowship, OR (2008-2010).

Rev. Colbert performed services on behalf of the denomination, as a Board Member and as a member of the Pacific Central District (PCD) of the UUA. Also for the PCD she served the Refugio Planning Committee; was Facilitator/Planner for the Buried Voices Convocation of Women and for the PCD Board Retreat, as well as for Davis, Palo Alto and Livermore UU board retreats. She served as a member and Program Chair for the Pacific Northwest District of UUA (PNWD). She was also a member of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association.

In addition to her ministry, Rev. Colbert passionately served the communities to which she belonged. She was President for the Ministerial Association of San Luis Obispo County; training organizer on Domestic Violence for The San Luis Obispo Ministerial Association; organizer for the Ecumenical Emergency Homeless Shelter; and appointed member of the District Attorney’s Task Force on Domestic Violence. She was a speaker at Persian Gulf War protests; at Pro Choice rallies; and at several interfaith services. Carolyn served as organizer and preacher for interfaith AIDS service at Cal Poly University, and as a Board member for the Tri Cities, WA, Women’s Shelter. She was instrumental in organizing Nagasaki Memorial ceremonies and various Peace programs in Richland, WA (home of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation). Her workA Structure of Adolescent Workshops was published by Project Community and the Teacher’s Center for Self-Understanding, University of California. In her spare time, Carolyn practiced her Tai Chi form (Yang style), read and wrote poetry. She also loved to travel and had a large plant collection.

Carolyn is survived by her daughters: Charlin Sawyer, Shanda Sawyer, Katherine Sawyer; her beloved black cat Layla; and many UUA communities and friends who knew her during her lifetime of service.

In lieu of flowers, donations will be gratefully accepted by the family. Donations received will be used to cover the funeral and memorial costs and any donations received over these costs will be donated toPlanned Parenthood. If you choose to donate, please make your check payable to Charlin Sawyer with “In honor of the Rev. Carolyn W. Colbert” in the memo line, and send it to Rev. Carolyn Colbert, PO Box 1104, Woodacre, CA 94973.

A celebration of Carolyn’s life will take place at 4 p.m. on Sunday, October 13, 2019 at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley, 1 Lawson Rd, Kensington, CA 94707.

Notes of condolences can be sent to: Charlin Sawyer, PO Box 1104, Woodacre, CA 94973.

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In Loving Memory of Erinn Melby (1948 - 2019)

Posted By Administration, Monday, July 22, 2019

The Rev. Erinn Jeanne Caitlin Melby died on May 18, 2019, at the age of 70.

Rev. Melby was born on July 15, 1948 in Benson, Minnesota, to William Lincoln Melby and Betty Jane (McNellis) Melby. In 1975, she received a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and English from Macalester College, and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Southern Colorado. Rev. Melby spent eight years in the U.S. Air Force as a Computer Operations Supervisor for NORAD Headquarters in Colorado Springs, CO, before heeding her call toward ministry. In 1984, she graduated from Starr King School for the Ministry (SKSM), CA, with her Master of Divinity.

Rev. Melby was one of the first Unitarian Universalists to attend seminary as an openly trans person; she came out to SKSM during her first year while giving a presentation on “gays, lesbians, and transsexuals.” She had first come out as trans in 1967 and first changed her name in 1975, although she went on to maintain a relationship with her pre-transition self, Karl, for the rest of her life.

Like almost all aspiring trans UU ministers, Rev. Melby experienced barriers to living out her call to ministry. She went before the Ministerial Fellowship Committee (MFC) unsuccessfully in both 1984 and 1985. Almost a decade later, after a two-year chaplain residency and a day-and-a-half-long psychological evaluation, she was finally passed by the MFC. She was welcomed into preliminary fellowship in 1994 and ordained on June 4, 1995, by the UU Church of Davis, CA.

Following her ordination, Rev. Melby served as a Chaplain/Spiritual Counsellor at Yolo Hospice for sixteen years (1995–2011). In leading the annual memorial service, her warm, resonant voice welcomed everyone to touch the tenderness of grief, no matter what face of “The Holy” they had or hadn’t known. She simultaneously served the UU Church of Palo Alto, CA, as its first community minister (1999–2001) and directed a Pastoral Associates Program at the congregation. In 2011, Rev. Melby retired from active ministry.

Outside her ministry, Rev. Melby was an active participant in UUA district and regional activities. She was involved with the Pacific Central District UUA, particularly around LGBTQ issues. She also was an active member of TRUUsT (Transgender Religious professional UUs Together). One of the fifteen people who attended the first TRUUsT membership retreat in 2016 in Pacific Grove, CA, Rev. Melby was a minister to ministers, offering her chaplaincy and pastoral care to the TRUUsT community.

Throughout her life, Rev. Melby worked on issues of social justice, particularly related to HIV/AIDS. She served as a Consultant to the Sacramento AIDS Interfaith Network; assisted the Sacramento AIDS Housing Alliance; and provided pastoral care to the LGBTQ community via the Lambda Center and UC Davis Medical Center. In her spare time, she enjoyed writing short stories, reading mysteries, drawing, and painting, as well as attending concerts and plays.

Rev. Melby is survived by her children Hans Melby, Bjorn Melby, Anna (Melby) Strain; her aunt Joanne (McNellis) Kavanaugh; four grandchildren; hundreds of friends; and her extended family within TRUUsT.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to TRUUsT (Transgender Religious professional UUs Together) and/or the American Cancer Society.

A celebration of Rev. Melby’s life will take place at 2 pm on Saturday, July 27th, 2019, at the UU Church of Davis, 27074 Patwin Road, Davis, CA 95616.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Anna Strain at 8805 Acadia Road, St. Paul, MN 55125.

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In Loving Memory of Eileen B. Karpeles (1925 - 2018)

Posted By Administration, Monday, March 11, 2019
The Rev. Eileen B. Karpeles died on October 25, 2018 at the age of 93.

Eileen was born on June 8, 1925 in Cleveland, OH to Laurence Botsford and Grace A. Tong. She graduated from the University of Chicago, IL in 1946 with a Bachelor of Philosophy, after which she earned a Bachelor of Science in Education (1950) and a Master of Arts in English (1951), both from the Ohio University, OH. She then taught high school and college-level English for several years before following her ministerial call. In 1977, Eileen earned her Master of Divinity from the Starr King School for the Ministry, CA.

Rev. Karpeles was ordained on September 28, 1977 by the Towson UU Church in Lutherville, MD. She served the All Souls UU Church, New London, CT from 1977 until 1980. In that year she was called to the Orange Coast UU Church, Costa Mesa, CA where she would minister until 1983. Then for the next decade, Rev. Karpeles served as an interim minister, working with the First UU Society of Albany, NY (1984); the UU Society of Greater Springfield, MA (1985); the UU Church in Eugene, OR (1985-1986); the UU Church of Sarasota, FL (1986-1988); the UU Fellowship of Boca Raton, FL (1987-1988); and the UU Society of Sacramento, CA (1989-1990) where she was the first woman minister. She then ministered at the UU Congregation of Miami, FL (1991); and finally, at the Williamsburg UUs, VA (1992-1993) before retiring from the active ministry in 1993.

The many services Rev. Karpeles carried out on behalf of the denomination included Youth Camp Program Director at the Murray Grove (Lanoka Harbor, NJ) from 1968 to 1973, and Dean for the Ferry Beach Singles Week in 1978 and 1979. She was an active member of the Ministerial Sisterhood UU and the UU Ministers’ Association beginning in 1975. Eileen served the UUMA Executive Committee from 1979 to 1980; was a workshop leader for the Camp de Benneville Pines during 1980 until 1983; and served as Minister in Residence for the Pacific South West District Leadership Training School in 1982 and in 1984. After her retirement she became an active member and volunteer leader at the UU Society of Sacramento.

Eileen maintained a lifelong interest in writing, with works published in the New London Day, the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the UU World and other denominational compilations, as well as two unpublished novels and a work in progress on conflict resolution. Her greatest personal interests included travel, reading and rummage sales.

Eileen’s daughter Tamia noted: “In many respects, my mom was fearless with an independent spirit that could be both terrifying and inspiring; for example, she loved to drive, and continued to hit the open road on solo trips well into her 80s, visiting friends around the country and car-camping at night in Wal-Mart parking lots. Her life was an adventure and it was my honor to be my mother’s caregiver during her final years.”

Eileen is survived by her daughters: Katherine Maeda, Robin Magdalene, and Tamia Karpeles, as well as a granddaughter, Kendra Maeda.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of one’s own choosing as well as to the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association.

A family remembrance was held in MD on December 15, 2018.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Tamia Karpeles at 8387 Elm Rd, Millersville, MD, 21108.

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In Loving Memory of Beverly Bumbaugh (1936 - 2019)

Posted By Administration, Monday, March 11, 2019
The Rev. Beverly A. Bumbaugh died on February 14, 2019 at the age of 82.

Beverly was born on May 2, 1936 in Hagerstown, MD to Paul L. Keplinger and Thelma A. Keplinger. She graduated from the Wilmington College, OH in 1958 with a Bachelor of Arts in English. In 1981, Beverly completed her independent study of UU Ministry under guidance of the Ministerial Education Committee of the Mount Vernon Unitarian Church, VA.

Rev. Bumbaugh was ordained on January 22, 1978 by the Mount Vernon Unitarian Church in Alexandria, VA where she carried out her first ministry from 1977. In the year 1982, she was called to the UU Fellowship at Easton, MD; Rev. Bumbaugh simultaneously executed her parish ministry at these two congregations until 1984. In 1986, she accepted a call from the East Shore UU Church in Kirtland, OH where she would serve as an interim minister until 1987. Then, over the next decade, Rev. Bumbaugh carried out a series of vital interim and called ministries, at the following congregations: the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Rockland, NY (1987-1991); the Muttontown UU Fellowship, NY (1992); the UU Church of the Lehigh Valley, PA (1992-1993); the South Nassau UU Congregation, NY (1994-1995); and finally at the Beacon UU Congregation in Summit, NJ (1995-1998) as the first woman minister. Upon her retirement in 1998, the Beacon congregation elected her their Minister Emeritus.

Rev. Bumbaugh carried out a great deal of service on behalf of the denomination. She functioned as a Secretary for the Greater Washington Religious UU Professionals from 1979 to 1981; as a workshop leader for the RE Conferences for Greater Washington Area, Joseph Priestly District and the UU Fellowship for Social Justice in 1979, and for the YRUU conference in 1983. She was Secretary for the Metro NY UUMA from 1988 to 1991. Rev. Bumbaugh also served the Unitarian Universalist Mid-Atlantic Community under various position: as a workshop presenter from 1990 to 1993, as a board member from 1990 to 1992, and as a music director in 1992.

Beyond her ministry, Beverly was socially active throughout her life. She served as a member of the Specific Learning Disability Board (1985-1986); the Religious Advisory Committee (1990-1991); the Planned Parenthood of Westchester and Rockland counties in NY (1990-1991); and the Freeport Interfaith Clergy (1994). Furthermore, she served as an occasional adjunct professor for the Meadville Lombard Theological school. She also had several of her writings published some of which include, Angels and Experiments (1974) published in the Journal of the Liberal Ministry; and Judith Sargent Murray Speaking (1985) published by the Murray Grove Association. In her spare time, Beverly enjoyed choral singing, playing the pipe organ, piano and autoharp; and participating in amateur dramatics. She also loved sewing, quilting and wall-papering.

Beverly is survived by her spouse Rev. David E. Bumbaugh; her children Mark Bumbaugh, Geoffrey Bumbaugh, Stephen Bumbaugh, and Julia Bumbaugh-Shah; her grandsons Salif and Stefan Bumbaugh, Zander and Griffen Shah; and her siblings Janet Keplinger Cyzyk, Alice Keplinger Kinch, Mary Lou Keplinger, Paul L Keplinger, and Robert P Keplinger.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of one’s own choosing, as well as to the Beacon Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Summit, NJ.
Memorial services will take place at 2.30 pm on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at Bristol Village, 660 E 5th St, Waverly, OH 45690; and at 2.30 pm on Saturday, May 25, 2019 at the Mount Vernon Unitarian Church, 1909 Windmill Lane, Alexandria, VA 22307.

Notes of condolences may be sent to the Rev. David E. Bumbaugh at 335 Oak Ave, Waverly, Ohio 45690.

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In Loving Memory of Clark B. Olsen (1933-2019)

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 5, 2019
The Rev. Clark B. Olsen died on January 21, 2019 at the age of 85.

Clark was born on June 22, 1933 in Boston, MA to Arthur W. Olsen and Catherine B. Olsen. He graduated from the Oberlin College, OH with a Bachelor of Arts in 1955, following which he earned his Bachelor of Divinity from the Harvard University in 1959.

Rev. Olsen was ordained on October 28, 1959 by the UU Congregational Society of Westborough, MA (formerly the First Unitarian Society of Westborough) where he carried out his ministry from 1957 to 1962. He was then called to the Berkeley Fellowship of UUs, CA where he would serve until 1968. In that year Rev. Olsen accepted a call from the Unitarian Church in Glasgow, Scotland, and served the Scottish congregation for five months as an interim minister. Finally, from 1968 to 1978, he served the Morristown Unitarian Fellowship, NJ before launching a second career as an organizational consultant to corporations, nonprofits, and churches.

Rev. Olsen carried out a great deal of services on behalf of the denomination. He was Board Member for the Pacific Central District from 1965 to 1968. He served the NY Metro District as a Board Member from 1970 to 1974, and as President of the Board from 1971 to 1973. He then functioned as a “Good Offices” person for the NY Metro District, UU Ministers Association from 1974 to 1976 and chaired the NY Metro District, R.E Committee for a year (1975-1976). In 1976, Rev. Olsen became a Theme Speaker for a week conference “Life on a Star” held in Star Island, NH. Furthermore, he was a member and Vice-chairman for the UUA Planning Committee and served the UUA’s Fulfilling the Promise Committee. Rev. Olsen functioned as Vice-President for the UUA for two years (1986-1988); he also served on the UUA’s Board (2007-2008). He was Denominational Affairs Chair (2011-2017) for the UU Congregation of Asheville, NC. Moreover, he served as a leader for numerous workshops on UU Worship for local groups, districts and for the UU Ministers Association annual meetings.

Throughout his life, Rev. Olsen was a staunch advocate for civil rights and racial justice. Upon Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s call to his fellow clergy to march for African American Voting Rights in the wake of “Bloody Sunday” in 1965, Clark travelled to Selma, AL. While walking to the Brown’s Chapel to hear Dr. King speak, Clark and two other UU ministers, Orloff Miller and Jim Reeb, were beaten by four men; two days later Rev. Reeb lost his life. This incident proved to be critical to the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and inspired Clark to be a more empathetic, more human, and compassionate leader in the cause of freedom and justice. Clark started speaking worldwide about the Civil Right Movements and his personal experiences. He traveled to Selma ninety times to share his story through a Sojourn Project (a California based nonprofit that takes middle and high school students to civil rights movement locations to forge understanding and awareness towards personal and civic responsibility). In 2015, UUA awarded him the UUA’s 2015 Award for Distinguished Service to the Cause of Unitarian Universalism.

Rev. Olsen also labored tirelessly on behalf of the communities to which he belonged. He provided Clergy Consultation Service on abortion from 1968 to the time of abortion rights legislation. He was a member of the Morris County Drug Abuse Council from 1971 to 1975 and Chairman of the Advisory committee for the Morris School District. Rev. Olsen was on the Legislative Action Committee for the State Sen. Stephen Wiley and succeeded in establishing a new bikeway planning office in the NJ Dept of Transportation. He was also on the Board for the Family Service Agency in Morristown, NJ. In his spare time, Clark enjoyed reading, listening to music, gardening, being with friends and working with tools. He had great interest in camping and travelling. He travelled extensively in the United States and had visited nearly every country in West and East Europe.

Clark is survived by his wife Anna Olsen; his children Marika Olsen and Todd Olsen; and his brother Lee. He was predeceased by his first wife Ludmilla, his sister Elaine, and his brothers Dexter and Tyler.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of one’s own choosing as well as to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville.

A celebration of Clark’s life will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville, NC 28801.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Anna Olsen at 23C Trillium Ct, Asheville, NC 28805.

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In Loving Memory of Carol Fincher (1932 - 2018)

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 5, 2019
The Rev. Carol Fincher died on December 22, 2018 at the age of 86.

Carol was born on December 25, 1932 in Fairfax, OK to parents Ed Armel Fincher and Dorothy Ellen Fincher. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the Southern Connecticut State University, CT in 1980 following which she earned her Master of Divinity from the Starr King School for Ministry, CA in 1986.

Rev. Fincher was ordained on April 27, 1986 by the Unitarian Universalist Church of Utica, NY. Following her ordination, she served the Unitarian Church of Charlotte, NC as a Summer Minister from June 1986 to August 1986, and ministered at the Amarillo UU Fellowship in Amarillo, TX for two years. In the year 1988, she was called to the UU Church of Stillwater, OK where she would serve from 1988 until 1994. Then for nearly half a decade, Rev. Fincher performed a series of Parish ministries at three congregations: the UU Society of Mill Creek, Newark, DE (1994-1995); the May Memorial UU Society, Syracuse, NY (1995-1996); and finally, at the Community UU Congregation, Tulsa, OK (1996-1998).

Rev. Fincher carried out a great deal of service on behalf of the denomination. She was on Board for the Southwest UU District for three years and Chair for the 1994 Nominating Committee of the Board. She functioned as a member of the Unitarian Universalist Minister’s Association and the Liberal Ministers of the Delaware Valley (Unitarian Universalist). Furthermore, Rev. Fincher served as a Convener for the UU Ministerial Group in Tulsa, OK.

Outside her denominational work, Carol belonged to several community organizations. She was member of the Delaware Nature Society; the National Conference on Christian and Jews; the Alban Institute; and the Interfaith Interim Ministers Association. She served on the Board for the Neighborhood Nursery, an organization that provided low cost childcare to the low-income families. She also wrote a column for the Southwest Women in Religion Newsletter and had numerous of her articles published in the Hockessin Community News. One of her pieces, “Unitarian and Universalist: History, Beliefs, Rites of Passage” was published by the Stillwater News and Press. In her spare time, Carol enjoyed jewelry making, paper making, photography, music and ballet.

Carol is survived by her sister Dorothy Davis; her children Dennis DeGraad (Jeanne) and Ellen DeGraad; her grandchildren Kevin DeGraad, Derek DeGraad (Caitlin) and Jack DeGraad (Faith); and her several nieces, nephews and cousins.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of one’s own choosing, as well as to the UU Church of Stillwater, 320 S Stallard St, Stillwater, OK 74074.

A celebration of Carol’s life took place at 3 pm on Saturday, January 12th, 2019 at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Stillwater, 320 S Stallard St, Stillwater, OK 74074.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Ellen DeGraad at 829 N Burdick St Apt A, Stillwater, OK 74075.

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In Loving Memory of Cynthia J. Edson (1945 - 2018)

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 14, 2019
The Rev. Dr. Cynthia J. Edson died on October 6, 2018 at the age of 73.

Cynthia was born on July 26, 1945 in Weymouth, MA to William Gordon Edson and Catherine Jane (Wishart) Edson. She graduated from the University of Connecticut, CT in 1967 with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications, following which she earned her Master of Theology from the Boston University, MA in 1970. In 1972, Cynthia received her Doctor of Ministry from the Andover Newton Theological School, MA.

Rev. Dr. Edson was ordained on May 24, 1970 by the First Parish UU Church at Saugus, MA where she carried out her ministry from 1969 to 1971. She was then called to the UU Church of Berks County in Reading, PA where she would serve from 1973 until 1977. On September of 1977, Rev. Dr. Edson accepted a call from the Unitarian Church of Bangor, ME and ministered to the Bangor congregation for two years. Over the next decade, Rev. Dr. Edson carried out series of interim and called ministries at the following congregations: the First Parish Church in Beverly UU, Beverly, MA (1983-1985); the First Parish Church of the Presidents, Quincy MA (1986); the Anchorage UU Fellowship Inc., Anchorage, AK (1987-1988); the UU Fellowship of Fayetteville, Fayetteville, NC (1988-1989); the Unitarian Coastal Fellowship, Morehead City, NC (1988-1991); the UU Congregation of Greenville, Greenville, NC (1988-1991); the UU Church of Weymouth, Weymouth, MA (1991-1992); and finally at the Emerson UU Church, Canoga Park, CA (1993).

Rev. Dr. Edson carried out a great deal of service on behalf of the denomination. She served the UU World as a Managing Editor from 1970 to 1972 and as President for the Joseph Priestley District from 1973 to 1976. She was a member of the Unitarian Universalist Women’s Federation; co-editor for the UUMA’s newsletter during 1977 to 1979; and secretary for the Ferry Beach Park Association beginning 1981 to 1982.

Outside her denominational work, Cynthia belonged to several community organizations. She functioned as an environmental chair for the League of Women Voters, and as a steering committee member for the Ministerium (Ecumenical) Social Action Cabinet. She was advisor for People Against Rape, as well as clergy advisor to Planned Parenthood, Maternal Health Service of NE PA, and School Health Education Advisor for the Bangor city, ME. Furthermore, she served as a delegate to the White House Conference on Libraries. Cynthia was also a dedicated writer. Her writings appeared in the Journal of Pastoral Care; the Journal of Psychical Research; and the Haiku Foundation. She showed a lifelong interest in antiques, art and architecture, bibliomania, folklore, and enjoyed tennis.

Cynthia is survived by her longtime friends, Nancy and Ross Edwards, Rosemary Jenkes, Mary Lou Rogers, Carol X (PA), Barry and Kenneth Glover.

A memorial service is being planned for the spring.

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