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In Memory of . . . Eugene Barnett Navias (1928-2014)

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 15, 2014

The Rev. Eugene “Gene” Barnett Navias died on August 17, 2014, at the age of 86.  Gene was born on March 18, 1928 to devout Unitarians Dr. Louis Navias and Adelaide Gant Navias. He graduated from St. Lawrence University with a Bachelor of Arts in 1949 and from the Theological School of St. Lawrence with a Bachelor of Divinity in 1951.


Rev. Navias was ordained to the ministry by the First Unitarian Church of Cleveland, OH in 1951. He was called to serve as associate minister and director of religious education to the First Unitarian Church of Cleveland from 1951 to 1957; minister to the Unitarian Church of Concord, NH (now UU Church of Concord) from 1957 to 1963; religious education field consultant to the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) from 1963 to 1982; director of the Religious Education Department of the UUA from 1982 to 1993; associate minister to Arlington Street Church of Boston, MA from 1993 to 1999; and Minister Emeritus of Arlington Street Church from 1999 to 2014. In 2005, he was awarded the UUA’s Distinguished Service Award.

Rev. Navias was instrumental in shaping Unitarian Universalist religious education. Throughout his ministry, he led numerous workshops and trainings and brought an experiential approach to teaching those who would then teach children. While serving the UUA as a field consultant, he began developing the About Your Sexuality program. The program was launched in 1971, and was run by Unitarian Universalist congregations for over 25 years. In the late 1970's, Gene collaboratively developed the Renaissance Program, a religious education training program, and in 1981, he developed the UUA’s Accreditation Program for Directors of Religious Education. He was also involved in developing the Meadville Lombard summer and winter institutes for religious educators, and he edited the UUA’s Religious Education AIDS Packet in the late 1980’s. During the ten years that he served as director of the UUA’s Religious Education Department, participation in religious education grew by nearly forty percent.


Rev. Navias successfully united music with religious education. He authored new lyrics to well-known tunes, such as “John Murray Sailed Over the Ocean,” as a way of teaching Unitarian Universalist history and theology. He served on a team that studied the feasibility of the first Unitarian Universalist hymnal, and organized a program of narrations and hymns for the 1992 UUA General Assembly titled "Singing - Shouting - Celebrating: 200 Years of Universalism."

Gene was a member of the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association (UURMaPA); the Liberal Religious Educators Association (LREDA); and was involved with the former Boston UU Gays and Lesbians, which met at Arlington Street Church.


Gene had a wide range of interests, and succeeded in many different areas of life. Quite musical, he was an accomplished pianist and a tenor soloist. He was fond of opera, and attended the Glimmerglass Festival each summer. He collected church music, and his collection is now housed at Arlington Street Church. During the six years he served in Concord, NH, he was involved with a community theater organization and performed in a number of musicals. Gene also enjoyed traveling, and with his partner, Jim, ventured to Austria, Czech Republic, England, Mexico, and Spain. Additionally, he was interested in antiquing; his mother was an avid antique collector, and she brought Gene along in her hunts. When Gene entered adulthood, he developed his own interest in antiquing, and he soon couldn’t pass by an antique store without entering.


Gene is remembered lovingly by family and friends. His niece, Jennifer Hamlin-Navias, recounts, “he was always very interested in who you were as a person, and whatever response he gave you was crafted around whoever you were” Gene’s partner, Jim, describes him as “energetic” and “effervescent.” He remembers, “to say Gene was good natured would be to put it mildly.”

Gene is survived by his guardian Jim Buckley; nieces Rebecca Atwood (Barry Atwood), Susan Perkins (Mark Perkins), Mathilda Navias (Dan Bell); and nephew Geoffrey Navias (Jennifer Hamlin-Navias). He is also survived by thirteen grandnieces and nephews and three great-grandnieces and nephews.


A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 5th, at Arlington Street Church, 351 Boylston Street, Boston, MA, 02116. Doors will open at 1:00 p.m.


In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Gene B. Navias Memorial Fund, Arlington Street Church, 351 Boylston Street, Boston, MA, 02116. Checks should be made to Arlington Street Church with Gene B. Navias Memorial Fund noted in the memo line.


Notes of condolences may be sent to Jim Buckley, 11A Senate Road, Milford, MA, 01757.



Thomas, Joshua. Christian Educators of the 20th Century Project. Protestant Educators - Eugene B. Navias. Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, n.d. Web. 1 Sept. 2014.

 

 

 

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In Memory of . . . Cornelis Johannes Bakker (1917-2014)

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 12, 2014
The Rev. Cornelis "Neil" Johannes Bakker died on August 10, 2014 at the age of 97. Neil was born on May 29, 1917 to Hendrik Bakker and Dina Bakker. He served the US Army as a Tank Commander from 1941 to 1946, and continued with the Army Reserves after the war; he retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. He went on to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree from George Washington University in 1949 and with a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School in 1960.

Rev. Bakker was ordained to the ministry in 1963 by the First Unitarian Society of Gardner, MA. He served as a Protestant chaplain to the Gardner State Hospital from 1963 to 1977, and concurrently, minister to the First Unitarian Society of Gardner, MA from 1963 to 1979. He then served as minister to the First Universalist Church of Providence, RI from 1979 to his retirement in 1990. He was named Minister Emeritus of the First Unitarian Society of Gardner in 1984, and Minister Emeritus of the First Unitarian Church of Providence in 1990.

Rev. Bakker was committed to both his faith and his community. He served as president and vice president of the Central Massachusetts District of the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), and served on the district’s board, evaluation committee, and appraisal committee. He also served as member and president of the North Atlantic Interdistrict Council of the UUA; the nominating committee and board of the Ballou-Channing District of the UUA; and the MA Council of Churches. He held membership with the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association; co-founded the Gardner-Athol Area Mental Health Association, and actively served the American Red Cross, United Way of America, the Doolittle Home, the Human Rights Committee, the CG Jung Center, the Netopian Club, and the Krishnamurti Society.

Neil held lifelong interests in stained glass, etching, trains, sport cars, fairs, foods, bicycling, hiking, and traveling. He was a talented artist and photographer, and had a love of classical music and opera.

Neil’s wife, Melba, describes him as a “wonderful father”, and a lover of people and laughter. “We adored each other,” she mused. Melba explains, “it didn’t matter who the person was, Neil treated all people equally and lovingly.”

Neil is survived by his wife of 57 years, Melba Ann Bakker, his devoted daughter, Stephanie A. Bakker; and his sister Henrietta Weiting. He is predeceased by his son, Frederick J. Bakker and his sister, Louise Kantor. He is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be held on Sunday, September 14th, at 3pm, at the First Unitarian Church of Providence, RI, 1 Benevolent St, Providence, RI 02906.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the First Unitarian Church of Providence, RI, 1 Benevolent St, Providence, RI 02906, or to Hamilton House, 276 Angell St, Providence, RI 02906 or the VNA of Rhode Island, 475 Kilvert Street, Warwick, RI, 02886.

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In Memory of . . . James R. Wentz (1934-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 10, 2014
The Rev. James “Jim” R. Wentz died on August 5, 2014 at the age of 79. Jim was born on August 17, 1934 to Orville and Louise. He graduated from Indiana Central University (now University of Indianapolis) with a Bachelor of Arts in 1961 and from Meadville Lombard Theological School with a Bachelor of Divinity in 1966. He went on to receive a Master of Science from the University of Bridgeport in 1981.

Rev. Wentz was ordained to the ministry in 1966 by the All Souls Unitarian Church of Indianapolis, IN. He was first called to the Unitarian Universalist Society of Oneonta, NY in 1966, and served the congregation until 1976. He then served the South Nassau Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Freeport, NY, from 1976 to 1980.

After retiring from parish ministry, Jim began officiating weddings, and built a business around the practice. He was known as “Rev. I Do.” He performed weddings for over three decades, and presided over his daughter’s and son’s ceremonies. Jim also had a few “15 minutes of fame” marrying couples on both the Ricki Lake Show and Les Brown Show.

Jim was active within the denomination. He served as a delegate to the New York State Convention of Universalists’ Annual Meetings from 1966 to 1976; part-time administrative secretary to the St. Lawrence Unitarian Universalist District from 1971 to 1976; vice president of the Iroquois Chapter of the Unitarian Universalists Ministers Association (UUMA) from 1972 to 1973; president of the Iroquois Chapter of the UUMA from 1973 to 1974; and treasurer of the Metro District Chapter of the UUMA from 1978 to 1980. Even after his retirement from parish ministry, Jim was an active member of the New York Metro District of the UUMA .

Jim was a philosopher, thought-leader, and writer, recently authoring a book offering his spiritual perspective in the quest for making the world a better place. He brought his interest in writing and humor to regular participation in the New Yorker’s cartoon caption contest as well as limericks for his children and grandchildren at birthday and holiday occasions. Like his father, Jim was a jack-of-all-trades, knowledgeable and handy in many aspects of home improvement. His strong qualities of patience, kindness, and understanding was seen when teaching the basics of power tools, beginner’s chess, and life lessons such as, “Do the best you can.”

Jim is survived by his daughter, Lisa Medley (Roger Medley); son, Nicholas Wentz (Lori Wentz); sister, Lucille Wentz; former wife, Sara Angus; and grandchildren, Nicholas Wentz Jr., Shayla Wentz, and Miles Medley.

A memorial service will be held on November 1, 2014 at 1:00 P.M., at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Shelter Rock, 48 Shelter Rock Road, Manhasset, NY 11030.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to UNICEF (www.unicef.org).

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In Memory of . . . Stewart E. Hild (1924-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 10, 2014
The Rev. Stewart E. Hild died on July 12, 2014 at the age of 90. Stewart was born on March 3, 1924 to Edward and Grace Hild. He graduated from the University of Delaware with a Bachelor of Science in 1948 and from Drew University with a Master of Divinity in 1951. He was a member of the Armed Forces during World War II, and served in the Army Specialized Training Program.

Rev. Hild was ordained to the Methodist ministry in 1952. He was called to the Community Methodist Church in Massapequa, Long Island, NY from 1951, and he served there until 1956. He was fellowshipped as a Unitarian minister in 1956. He held pastorates at the Unitarian Congregation of Franklin, NH, (now the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Franklin) from 1958 to 1975; All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church in Watertown, NY from 1975 to 1989; and was named Minister Emeritus of All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church in 1989.

Rev. Hild served the denomination in various capacities. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the New Hampshire/Vermont District of the Unitarian Universalist Association (consolidated with the Northeast District in 2008 to form the Northern New England Chapter); chairman of the Extension Department of the New Hampshire/Vermont District of the Unitarian Universalist Association; and Selma Presence Representative for the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Rev. Hild served as Vice President of the New Hampshire Council on World Affairs; Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Committee on Drugs and Drug Abuse; Director of the Lakes Region Mental Health Association; Assistant at the Peabody Home for the Aged; Board Member of the Family Counseling Service of Jefferson County, NY; Women’s Center of Jefferson County; Project Children North, Watertown; Urban Mission; Board of Community Action Planning Council of Jefferson County, and also served as Board President of Community Action Planning Council of Jefferson County.

Stewart was interested in travel, reading, and sports. While living in New Hampshire, he taught several classes in the History of Religion at Proctor Academy.

He is survived by his wife, Alma H. Hild; his sons, Edward G. Hild and Thomas S. Hild; grandchildren, Jared Hild, Cora Hild, and Wyatt Hild, and many cousins.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice in his name.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Alma H. Hild, 274 Schley Drive, Watertown, NY 13601.

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In Memory of . . . Dorothy S. Boroush (1925-2014)

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 8, 2014

The Reverend Dorothy S. Boroush died on June 14, 2014 at the age of 88. She died in Englewood, Colorado, in the home of her daughter, Gretchen, surrounded by flowers, family and friends.


Dorothy was born on October 3, 1925, in Tiffin, OH, to George Alfred Stinchcomb and Ruth Elise Brand Stinchcomb. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater from the State University of Ohio in 1977, and went on to attain a Master of Divinity from Chicago Theological Seminary in 1980.

 

After graduation, Dorothy was ordained to the Unitarian Universalist Ministry by the First Unitarian Church of Shaker Heights, OH, in 1980. Shortly thereafter, she was called to serve as minister to the Emerson Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (now Emerson Church Unitarian Universalist) of Troy, MI, from 1980 to 1984. She then served as interim minister to the First Parish Church of Groton, MA, from 1984 to 1985; the Unitarian Church of Marlborough and Hudson, of Hudson, MA, from 1985 to 1986; and the Unitarian Society of New Haven, CT, from 1986 to 1987. In 1987, she accepted the position of District Executive to the Ballou Channing District, serving 49 parishes in southern Massachusetts and Rhode Island until 1994. She formally retired from ministry in 1995, but eventually regretted the “premature decision” and went on to serve as interim minister of the Foxborough Universalist Church in 1999. Dorothy also served as “minister-on-call” for a number of New England congregations, stepping in for other ministers who were ill or called away. She loved preaching at the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House of Provincetown, MA, the Unitarian Universalist Society of Martha’s Vineyard, Bell Street Chapel in Providence, RI and many others. She led Sunday worship services at the First Parish Church of Taunton, MA, from July 2009 to April 2012, while the congregation was without a settled minister.


Throughout her ministry, Reverend Boroush dedicated time and service to numerous denominational organizations. She served on the Ohio-Meadville District’s Commissioned Lay Leaders Committee and the Holmes-Weatherly Award Panel. She served as Chair of the Michigan Extension Committee for two years, President of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association’s Michigan Chapter for two years, and Co-Chair of the Central Massachusetts’ Youth Adult Committee (YAC) for one year. She volunteered at the Doolittle Home of Foxboro, MA, and served on its board for a number of years.


Dorothy was a resolute advocate for women’s rights. Prior to entering the ministry, she worked as Director of Education and Public Relations for Pre-Term, a women's health clinic in Cleveland, OH. She was a charter member of the National Organization for Women’s Cleveland Chapter, and served on the organization’s board and public relations committee. She served as member of the Cleveland Abortion Rights Action League; and member of the Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights (now the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice).


Dorothy was very involved with the Unitarian Universalist Women’s Heritage Society (UUWHS). She served on the Society’s Board of Directors from June 1995 to June 2001. She was a contributor and editor to a series of short biographic descriptions of UU women, titled “Notable Universalist and Unitarian Women,” and was the editor of the last edition in 2000. She was actively involved with programs put on by the UUWHS and was involved with the development of UUWHS calendars. She sponsored, wrote, and edited the UUWHS’ 2002 Calendar on the first female ordained UUA Minister Reverend Antoinette Brown Blackwell, M.Div.


The arts and creativity were powerful forces in Dorothy’s life. More than 15 years of her youth were dedicated to the formal study of piano and acting. She was a well-known actor and director in community theater throughout her life, much of it to critical acclaim. Her classical piano training was sufficient to consider a professional position per her instructors. She wrote poetry and in the 1970/80's served as artistic director for the published poetry performance troupe, “Big Mama”. She also wrote, directed, and performed a one-act play about the life of Reverend Antoinette Brown Blackwell, the first ordained Minister in this country who also became a Unitarian Minister, that was staged in a number of Unitarian Universalist churches, also to great acclaim for its historic educational and creative aspects pertinent to the UUA.


Until nearly the end of her life, at age 86, Dorothy was still acting minister at First Parish Church in Taunton, MA.. where congregants there remember her as “a woman of deep faith,” “ dedicated,” “generous,” and “committed to the long-term health of the congregation.”
Dorothy’s family remembers her as a gardener, a collector of ‘spiritual rocks’, a lover of the color purple, a feminist, poetess, political activist, a bird and tomato lover. She was a singer of silly songs and crocheted works of art during meetings. Her mission was to leave this world in a better place.


Dorothy is survived by her daughter, Gretchen E. Boroush; her sons, Eric D. Boroush and Kurt A. Boroush; and granddaughter Janice E. Boroush as well as her brother Dr. Thomas G. Stinchcomb, and nephews James, William, David, and Dan Stinchcomb and their wonderful families.


A memorial service will be held at 11:00am on September 13, 2014, at First Parish Bridgewater Unitarian Universalist Church, 50 School Street, Bridgewater, MA 02324.


In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Unitarian Universalist History and Heritage Society, 27 Grove St., Scituate MA 02066.


Condolence may be sent to the family via Eric Boroush, #2 Gore St., Boston, MA 02120

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In Memory of . . . William L. Holden (1931-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 3, 2014
The Rev. William L. Holden died on August 22, 2014 at the age of 83. William was born in Boston, MA on June 2, 1931 to William L. Holden Sr. and Gladys L. Holden. As a child, he was recognized by friends and teachers for his generous and unselfish outlook on helping others. He was also a voracious reader, a pleasure he enjoyed throughout his life. In his early teens he became an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America. During his later teens and early twenties he served as a summer camp counselor then waterfront director for the YMCA's Camp Wiyaka in New Hampshire. During this time he was also active in leading church youth groups. He spent three summers working as waterfront director of Camp Joslin in Massachusetts. He attended Boston Public Schools and graduated from English High School in 1948. He then graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in Youth Group and Recreational Leadership from Springfield College in 1954, and entered the United States Army that same year. He served active duty until his honorable discharge in 1957. He went on to graduate with a Master of Social Work from the University of Connecticut in 1959, and with a Bachelor of Divinity from Crane Theological School at Tufts University in 1967.

Rev. Holden served as youth minister to the Stoneham Unitarian Church, of Stoneham, MA, from 1959 to 1961; and Minister of Education to the Unitarian Universalist Church of Medford, MA from 1962 to 1964. His extensive volunteer ministry included service as a volunteer hospital chaplain to Hennepin County Medical Center of Minneapolis, MN; volunteer police chaplain to the St. Paul, MN, Police Department; member of the Minnesota State Children’s Mental Health Advisory Committee; guest minister and consultant to countless Unitarian Universalist congregations; and co-founding of the Victim’s Intervention Project, a program out of the St. Paul Police Department that supports the families of homicide victims. He was ordained by the Unitarian Universalist Church of Minnetonka, MN in 1980.

After serving the parish ministry, William worked as a clinical social worker at the Vacaville Psychiatric Facility in Sacramento, CA; superintendent of the Delaware Youth Authority in Dover, DE; superintendent of the County Home School in Minnetonka, MN; and administrator of the Hennepin County Corrections Department of Hennepin County, MN.

Rev. Holden was active within the denomination. He co-founded the Central Valley Area Council of the Pacific Central District (PCD) of the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), and served on the council from 1965 to 1967. He served as board member of the Pacific Central District; Chairman of the Research and Planning Commission of the Pacific Central District; member of the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association; member of the Harper’s Ferry Ministerial Study Group; member of the Delaware Valley Ministerial Group; member of the Prairie Star Ministerial Group; program chair of the Dover Delaware Unitarian Universalist Fellowship; Liberal Religious Youth advisor in Massachusetts; workshop leader at Camp UniStar; and co-founder of The North Area Unitarian Fellowship of Sacremento, CA (now Unitarian Universalist Society of Sacramento).

During the 1960 and 1970s, William and his first wife, Joan, were very active in the civil rights movement, the farm workers movement, the anti-war movement, and the struggle against The John Birch Society. William remained politically engaged throughout his life, and was a life-long member of the American Civil Liberties Union. He also held membership with Toastmasters; the National Association of Social Workers; the National Council on Crime and Delinquency; and the Academy of Certified Social Workers. He served as a delegate to district and state democratic conventions, and headed up United Way campaigns in Hennepin County, MN.

William’s ministry was greatly impacted upon his near death experience of waiting to receive a heart transplant in July of 1985. He co-founded the Second Chance for Life Foundation in 1988, an organization with a mission to support people who have had or who are waiting to receive a heart transplant. He often sermonized about his experience and mentored many transplantees. Additionally, William became an active supporter of many lay led congregations in the Prairie Star District (consolidated in 2013 with the Central, MidWest, and Heartland Districts to become the MidAmerica Region). He was in relationship with over twenty congregations, and led worship services, helped strengthen religious education programs through speaking and counseling, and mentored ministerial interns. He served congregations in Sioux City, MN, St. Cloud, MN and Racine, WI, among others.

William was an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Minnetonka, of Wayzata, MN for over thirty years, and at his death, he was also a member of the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis, MN.

From childhood days in Boston, Bill's sister, Nancy, remembers observing her brother as he worked fastidiously, hours at a time, examining and studying (with a magnifying glass) special postage stamps. After careful scrutiny, he would carefully place those that qualified on just the right spot in his beautiful albums. She also remembers watching him build beautiful model airplanes with balsam wood, tissue paper, glue, and colorful paint. This resulted in dozens of colorful models hanging in flight, attached to the ceiling with fine thread.

Bill loved good theatre and fine music. He would often invite his sister to accompany him for an evening in Boston or a trip to Cape Cod for a magnificent concert or delightful theatre; this kindness and generosity influenced and enriched her entire life.

William is survived by his wife, Sondra Smalley; children, William Lynn (Karin Lauria), Barbara Lynn, Michele Wallace (Doug Root), Sarah Merwin (Kedrik), and Doug Smalley (Sara); grandchildren, Madeline, Chloe, Jack, Isaac, and Bennett; sister, Nancy Gear; nephews, Greg Ruetzler and Dean Ruetzler; cousin, Beaulah Welch; and best friend (and brother of the heart), Joe Keating.

A memorial service will be held at 2:00 P.M. on October 4th at the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis, 900 Mt Curve Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55403. Rev. David Breeden will officiate.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Second Chance for Life Foundation (http://www.secondchanceforlife.org/) or the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee (http://www.uusc.org/)

Notes of condolences may be sent to Bill Lynn, 12 Mountain Avenue, Marlborough, MA 01752; to Sondra Smalley, 5225 Grandview Square, #112, Edina, Minnesota 55436; and to Nancy Holden Gear, 10 Sebring Road, South Burlington, VT 05403.

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In Memory of . . . Janet H. Bowering (1930-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 3, 2014

The Rev. Dr. Janet Hartzell Bowering died on July 17, 2014 at the age of 83.  Jan was born on December 7, 1930 to Allen Reiff Hartzell and Catharine May Weiser. She graduated from St. Lawrence University in 1952 with a Bachelor of Arts. She went on to receive an Honorary Doctor of Divinity from Meadville Lombard Theological School in 1998.

Rev. Bowering was ordained on January 30, 1955 by The North Carolina Universalist Convention at The Universalist Church of Outlaw’s Bridge of Seven Springs, NC. In 1957, she was called to the Universalist Church of Kinston, NC; she served as part-time minister in Kinston until 1959, and as part-time minister at First Parish of Tyngsborough, MA from 1977 to 1979. She then served as minister of the Universalist Unitarian Church of Haverhill from 1979 to 1996, and upon her retirement in 1996, she was voted Minister Emerita.

Jan was passionate about religious education and viewed it as integral to ministry.  She was certified as a Religious Educator by the St. Lawrence Theological School in 1953, and while attending, she studied under Angus MacLean. Jan and her late husband, Rev. Vinton Bowering, worked with youth in churches, service projects and camps throughout their ministry. Jan served the Universalist Unitarian Church of Haverhill, MA, as Director of Religious Education from 1974 to 1979. She worked alongside her husband, who served as minister to the congregation from 1974 to 1979. In 1979, Rev. Vinton Bowering suffered a fatal heart attack and the church received special permission to by-pass a search process and call Rev. Jan Bowering as their minister.

Rev. Bowering’s ministry of the UU Church of Haverhill, MA, reached far beyond the congregation and into the community at large. In 1977, Rev. Bowering offered use of the Haverhill UU church to the Calvary Baptist Church of Haverhill, MA, as the Calvary Baptist Church had suffered a devastating fire. She later offered the basement of the church as a shelter for homeless individuals, and the shelter remained there for three years.

Jan was active in many denominational organizations. She served the Mass Bay Chapter of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association (UUMA) as member, senior Good Offices team member, Nominating Committee member, and Fall Conference planning committee member; the Unitarian Universalist Historical Society as board member and president; the Church of the Larger Fellowship as board member and executive committee member; and the Continental Board of the Unitarian Universalist Women’s Federation. She was the first female member of the ministerial study group, The Fraters of the Wayside Inn, and held membership with the Cedar Hill Study Group, the Central Midwest Chapter of the UUMA, the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association, and the Unitarian Universalist Association Professional Support Services Committee. She was an enthusiastic supporter and promoter of the Clara Barton Camp for over fifty years.

Jan valued her Universalist roots, and found it important to preserve the Universalist legacy. She served the Board of the Universalist Heritage Foundation, the Massachusetts Association of Universalist Women, and the Massachusetts Universalist Convention. She was mentored by Rev. Edna Bruner, and inspired by both Edna and Rev. Olympia Brown. She was known far and wide for her dramatic portrayal of Rev. Brown, and she offered her portrayal more than forty times.  

Rev. Bowering ministered to the Universalist Church in Kinston, NC, right after the Supreme Court decision on integration went into effect. Her time in Kinston presented challenges that she readily accepted. She wrote,

“I remember one time we took the LRY [Liberal Religious Youth] to hear Harry Golden speak in Kinston, 22 miles away. We didn’t know, or we would have prepared the kids for non-segregated seating. Fortunately we arrived late, were ushered in to a lecture in progress and sat hastily wherever we could. Afterward we stopped for ice cream, two cars full of young people, and tried to sort out feelings. It was interesting that they mainly didn’t want their parents to know what happened lest they jeopardize their chances to go places and do things with Mr. and Mrs. Bowrin’ ’”

 

An avid traveler, Jan loved to explore new places and meet new people. She collected foreign dolls, purchased during her travels and given to her by friends and family. She was an amateur potter, a painter and a naturalist; she relished time spent with her family at their summer house in rural Maine.

Jan’s family remembers her as “extremely inquisitive,” and “very practical.” Her daughter, Diana Bowering, describes how her mother was quick to take action upon hearing of a problem, and lived with a mentality of “let’s not talk about it, let’s get down there and do something about it.” Jan was known as extremely hard working, and “wasn’t one to sit around.” Diana reports how even when hospitalized and suffering from a wandering mind, her mother said of the hospital stay, “In theory, I don’t think this is the best use of my time.”

Her surviving family members include her loving children, Dawn Jordan and companion, John Hyland, Diana Bowering, Alan Bowering and wife, Leslie.; granddaughter, Laura Morley and husband Matthew; and great-grandson, William Morley.

A Celebration of Life will be held on September 20th, 2014, at 1:00 P.M., at the Universalist Unitarian Church of Haverhill, 15 Kenoza Avenue, Haverhill, MA 01830. A potluck lunch hosted by the UU Church of Haverhill will follow. All are welcome. A memorial gathering was held from 4:00 to 7:00 P.M., on Saturday, July 26th at Driscoll Funeral Home, 309 South Main Street, Haverhill, MA 01835.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Clara Barton Camp, P.O. Box 356 North Oxford, MA 01537 (www.bartoncenter.org); Ferry Beach Park Association, 5 Morris Avenue, Saco, ME 04072 (www.ferrybeach.org); or Merrimack Valley Hospice of Home Health Foundation, Attn: Tammy Stott, 360 Merrimack Street, Building 9, Lawrence, MA 01843 (www.homehealthfoundation.org).

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In Memory of . . . Alexander L. Craig (1937-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 3, 2014
The Rev. Alexander Lincoln Craig died on July 22, 2014, at the age of 76.  Alec was born on October 22, 1937 to Emily and Edward Craig. He graduated from Keene State College with a Bachelor of Education in 1959, a Master of Education in 1961, and from Syracuse University with a Doctorate of Education in 1968. He went on to study for three years at Bangor Theological Seminary.

Rev. Craig was ordained by the Universalist Church of Sangerville, ME (now Unitarian Universalist Church of Sangerville and Dover Foxcroft) in 1990. He was first called to serve as interim minister to the neighboring churches, the Universalist Church of Sangerville, ME and the First Universalist Church of Dexter, ME. He served both churches as interim minister from 1990 to 1992, and as settled minister from 1992 to 2000. He later served the Unitarian Universalist Church of St. Petersburg, FL as co-consulting minister from 2002 to 2005 and as pastoral care minister from 2009 to 2012; and Spirit of Life Unitarian Universalists of Odessa, FL, as part time minister from 2005 to 2012. He was named Minister Emeritus of both congregations in 2012.

Committed to the denomination, Alec was a member of the Northeast District of the Unitarian Universalist Minister’s Association (consolidated with the New Hampshire Vermont District in 2008 to form the Northern New England Chapter), and served the district as Chair of Extension, and Chair of Adult Activities. He also served as Northeast District Disaster Coordinator to the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee; liaison to students at Bangor Theological Seminary; and president and vice president of the West Central Cluster of UU Congregations, FL.

Alec believed that volunteering was important, and participated in many community organizations.  He served as board member and board president of the Charlotte White Center; volunteer for the Fund Raising Committee for Womancare; member of the Dexter Regional High School Civil Rights team; member of the Interfaith Alliance; member of the American Civil Liberties Union; volunteer for Habitat for Humanity; and volunteer teacher of safe driving courses for the American Association of Retired Persons. After moving to Florida, Alec worked part time for the Salvation Army.

Prior to ministry, Alec served the field of special education for twenty eight years. He worked in public school administration, college teaching, residential care, and institutional care.

Alec was gifted in pastoral care, and is described by his wife, Penny, as a “humanitarian” who “enjoyed serving people”. Penny remembers how Alec’s ministry included end-of-life pastoral care; she remarked, “He loved doing funerals, and loved visiting people in nursing homes and hospitals, holding their hands, and making sure their families felt like they were being heard.”

He is survived by his wife, Penny Craig; son, Geoffrey Craig (Sarah Flynn); daughter, Emily Kirk; granddaughters, Allora Craig, and Hannah Kirk; and brothers Duncan Craig (Cynthia McFadden) and Edward Craig (Frances Craig).

A Scottish Celebration of Life will be held in October, 2014 in Seminole, FL; a second Scottish Celebration of Life will be held in New Hampshire during the summer of 2015.   

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to American Lung Association, 55 W. Wacker Drive, Suite 1150, Chicago, IL 60601 (www.lung.org), and/or your local hospice organization.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Penny Craig, 9053 Pinehurst Drive, Seminole, FL 33777.

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In Memory of . . . Jennifer M. Slade (1959-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 3, 2014
The Rev. Jennifer Marie Slade died on July 17, 2014 at the age of 55.

Jennifer was born on July 11, 1959 to Robert W. Slade and Kennetha A. Slade. She graduated from New York University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1981, and from Harvard Divinity School with a Master of Divinity in 1990.

Rev. Slade was ordained by the Winchester Unitarian Society, of Winchester, MA in 1991. She held pastorates at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Greenville, NC from 1992 to 2002, and First Universalist Church of Sampson County at Red Hill, of Taylors Bridge, NC from 2006 to 2010. She served as sabbatical minister at Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Durham, NC, in 1999; Ministerial Settlement Representative for the Unitarian Universalist Association’s Southeast District from 2008 to 2011; and interim minister of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Woodstock, IL (now Tree of Life UU Congregation of McHenry, IL) from 2011 to 2012. She spent the past year serving as developmental minister to the Unitarian Church of Norfolk, VA.   

Rev. Slade’s ministry supported both the spiritual and physical growth of congregations. Throughout her time at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, the congregation grew from 165 adult members and 40 children and youth, to 360 adult members and 155 children and youth. The congregation also moved to a new, larger facility. Similarly, Jennifer guided the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Woodstock to a larger facility commensurate with its growth, particularly in Religious Education. She hoped to move the Norfolk congregation to a new location as rising tides repeatedly flooded the church.

Jennifer was invested in the larger denomination, and served as a member of the Southeast District of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association. She worked as a Chaplain Resident at the Bronson Methodist Hospital, of Kalamazoo, MI, and served as campus chaplain and advisor to the Unitarian Universalist Group at Furman University, of Greenville, NC. Jennifer was instrumental in starting the Montessori preschool, UU World of Children at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, founded in 1997. She was appointed a Merrill Fellow in 2000, and spent her sabbatical at Harvard.

Jennifer served various community organizations including the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and other Drug Abuse Services; AFFIRM a support organization for gay and lesbian youth; the Sampson County Methamphetamine Taskforce; the Urban League of the Upstate; and the Greenville Faith Communities United (now Interfaith Forum).

Jennifer’s colleagues and friends remember her as “bright,” “loving,” ‘kind,” and “inspiring.” She was a birthright Unitarian, and passionate about fixing social ills. She was very interested in reading; and she had an incredible memory for facts, dates, and important events in the lives of those she loved.

Jennifer is survived by her husband, John Santoianni; son, Samuel J. Santoianni; daughter, Emma M. Santoianni; brother, K. Sean Slade; sisters in law, Rachel L. Slade, Lois A. Sans, and Jeanne R. Century (Michael S. Weisman); brothers in law, Michael P. Normandin, and James M. Santoianni (Joan F. Santoianni); nieces, Samara Ruberg, Rachel K. Sans (Christian J. Palmer), Kimberly A. Cochran (Joshua Cochran), Katherine J. Santoianni; nephews, Kenan C. Slade, Reuben W. C. Slade, Christopher M. Santoianni, Stephen J. Santoianni (Valerie Santoianni), James R. Santoianni,  Matthew M. Santoianni, and Justin P. Santoianni.

A memorial service was held on Saturday, August 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. at the Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 4907 Garrett Rd., Durham, NC 27707.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The UU World of Children, att. Maureen Nery, 1135 State Park Road, Greenville, SC 29609 (http://www.montessoriworldofchildren.com/giving.html).

Notes of condolences may be sent to John Santoianni, 914 W. Markham Ave., Durham, NC, 27701.

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In Memory of . . . Margaret D. Tyndall (1923-2014)

Posted By Administration, Sunday, July 20, 2014
The Rev. Margaret D. Tyndall who died on March 29, 2014 at the age of 91. Margaret was born on March 7, 1923 to Harold and Kathleen Davies. She graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a Bachelor of Science in 1952. She went on to receive a Master of Divinity from Starr King School for the Ministry in 1968.

Rev. Tyndall was ordained to the Unitarian Universalist ministry in 1971 by the Unitarian Church of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She served as Associate Minister to the Unitarian Church of Edmonton from 1971 to 1973, and from 1977 to 1978. She was called to the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City in 1989, and served there as Minister of Religious Education until 1992.

Margaret was certified as a Director of Religious Education by the Unitarian Universalist Association in 1970. She served as Director of Religious Education to the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarians from 1961 to 1962; and the Unitarian Church of Edmonton from 1967 to 1971 and 1976 to 1978.

Margaret served as membership chairman of Liberal Religious Educators Association (LREDA) and Emergency Room chaplain at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Margaret and her spouse, Gordon Tyndall, were among the founders of the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarians and served the congregation as Sunday school teachers. Both were passionate about supporting Tibet; they raised thousands of dollars for the Tibetan Refugee Children’s Education Fund, and housed a number of Tibetan refugees.

Margaret was interested in painting, calligraphy and writing short stories. She was involved with the Berkeley Buddhist Peace Fellowship and studied Vipassana meditation. She also enjoyed swimming and hiking

Margaret is survived by her sons, David Tyndall (Christine Angell) and Benjamin Tyndall (Janice Tyndall); daughter, Caroline Salcedo (Jose Salcedo); grandchildren, Antonio, Ricardo, and Nina; and seven great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband of seventy-one years, Gordon Tyndall.

Notes of condolences may be sent in care of David Tyndall at 1510 Stallion Court, McKinleyville, CA, 95519.

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