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In Memory of . . . Janet B. Johnson (1942-2015)

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 7, 2015
The Rev. Janet Boykin Johnson died on March 25, 2015 at the age of 72.

Janet was born on June 4, 1942 to Thelma and Hubert Dallas. She graduated from Hunter College, in 1966, with a Bachelor of Arts Degree and from the University of Chicago with a Master of Social Work in 1972. She went on to attend Starr King School for the Ministry, and graduated with a Master of Divinity in 2002.

Rev. Johnson was ordained to the ministry in 2002 by the First Unitarian Society of Chicago, IL. Subsequently, she served as a chaplain to cancer patients at a hospital in Richmond, CA. She left the hospital in 2004 and started a private spiritual direction practice. From 2004 to 2007 she worked in the practice and as a part time minister to the Mt. Diablo Church of Walnut Creek, CA. She was called to serve as consulting minister to the Unitarian Universalist Church of Cortland, NY, in 2008, and served at Cortland until her retirement in 2013.

Prior to serving the ministry, Janet worked as a social worker within the Chicago Public School System for 18 years. During that time, Janet was also an active member of the First Unitarian Society of Chicago, and caretaker to two grandsons, whom she adopted, Jason Johnson and (the late) Justin Johnson.

Janet was very involved in community affairs, and ministered to the public long before receiving fellowship. While living in Chicago, she was on the Board of Directors of the River Oaks Towne Houses Cooperative and was a member of Amnesty International. Also during this time, from 1975 to 1992, she served as host and program coordinator of the international nonprofit, Experiment in International Living. Her duties included hosting exchange students from Germany, Japan, Mexico, and Brazil. After moving to California, Janet sat on several pastoral care hospital boards, and co-managed a clothing store operated by the Chaplaincy for the Homeless.

Janet enjoyed camping, knitting, crocheting, reading poetry, and listening to music

Janet is survived by her two daughters, Kimari Johnson and Kairis (Boykin) Bonella; her grandsons, Jason Johnson, Joseph Clayton, Jr., Johann Curry, Nieko Bonella, Angelo Bonella and Anton Klinnert; a son-in-law, Valentin Klinnert; step-children, Michele Freeny and Teren Johnson; first cousin, Thelma Williams and many distant cousins.

A memorial service was held at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 4, 2015 at the First Unitarian Church of Ithaca, 306 N. Aurora St., Ithaca, NY 14850. There will be another memorial service at a later date for family and friends outside of the Ithaca area.

For more information about where to send cards, flowers, and/or donations, please e-mail johnsonklinnert@yahoo.com.

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In Memory of . . . H. Carlton Moore, Jr. (1934-2015)

Posted By Administration, Monday, April 6, 2015
The Rev. H. Carlton Moore, Jr. died on February 19th, at the age of 80.

Carlton was born on May 5, 1934 to Herbert Carlton, Sr. and Lillian Moore. He graduated from Tufts University with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1956, and from Crane Theological School with a Master of Divinity in 1967.

Rev. Moore was ordained by the First Congregational Parish (Unitarian) of Norton, MA, in 1967. He was subsequently called to the First Congregational Parish, and he served as full time minister until 1970. From 1970 to 1995, Rev. Moore guest preached at over fifty congregations throughout Massachusetts, and spent his weekdays teaching and counselling students as a Professor of Engineering at Wentworth College. His pastorate at First Congregational Parish did not end in 1970, however. He continued to serve as the congregation's Minister of Religious Education and part time minister for the better part of the following twenty five years, leading many Sunday worship services, and keeping the doors of the church open to all.

Rev. Moore served as co-chairman of Board of Directors of the Cedar Hill Retreat Center, in Duxbury, MA, and chairperson of the Cedar Hill Committee. He also served on the Board of Directors of the Norton Public Library and the Daggett Crandall Newcomb Home in Norton; he served on both boards for over 30 years.

Carlton kept busy during his free time by beekeeping, baking bread, and making wine. He was an avid reader; his daughters remember that he was “always in his reading chair.” He presided over the marriages of his three daughters, and he is remembered by congregants and friends as a “gentle giant,” who was “very active in the community.”

Carlton is survived by his daughter, Emily C. Minihane (James), Rebecca M. Raymond (David), and Meredith M. Owens (James); sister, Carol MacLennan; and grandchildren, Lillian, Charlotte, Madeleine, John, Lydia, Alice, Cole, and Mason. He is predeceased by his wife Camilla C .Moore; and son, Warren C. Moore.

A funeral service was held on Tuesday, February 24th at 11:00 A.M. at the Norton Memorial Funeral Home, 19 Clapp St., Norton, MA 02766.

In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Herbert may be made to Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 or to Daggett Crandall Newcomb Home, 55 Newland St. Norton, MA 02766.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Mrs. Emily Minihane, 15 Vine Street, Franklin, MA 02038.

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In Memory of . . . Philip A. Smith (1930-2015)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, April 1, 2015
Rev. Philip A. Smith died on March 3, 2015 at the age of 84.

Philip was born on September 15, 1930 to Philip and Blanche Smith. He graduated Tufts College (now Tufts University) with a Bachelor of Art in 1954, and from Crane Theological School of Tufts with a Master of Divinity in 1957.

Rev. Smith was ordained by the Second Parish (Unitarian) of Marlboro, MA in 1957. He served as minister to the Second Parish (Unitarian) from 1957 to 1960. While holding that pastorate, he also served as associate chaplain to a prison in Norfolk, MA from 1958 to 1960. He went on to serve the First Unitarian Church in Louisville, KY from 1960 to 1963; and the Riverside Unitarian Church from 1963 to 1980.

Rev. Smith was a committed civil rights activist, and a spokesperson for social justice. Following the murder of James Reeb in 1965, Rev. Smith traveled to Selma, AL and marched from Selma to Montgomery. Throughout the 1960’s, he fearlessly led desegregation marches for the activist group, Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and served as an active member of the group. Additional community activities involved serving as an adult adviser to CORE in Louisville, KY; member of the Louisville Executive Board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP); member of the Board of Directors of the Kentucky Civil Liberties Union; and co-founder and co-chairman of Kentucky Committee to Abolish Capital Punishment.

While serving the Riverside Unitarian Church, Philip trained as a psychotherapist. He received the CA license in Marriage, Family, Child Counseling in 1970, and from 1970 to 1980, he practiced psychotherapy while ministering to the Riverside Congregation. Upon his retirement from ministry in 1980, Philip practiced psychotherapy full time.

Philip was very much a maverick, and valued individual creativity. He encouraged others to hold on to their uniqueness, and exhibit it with pride. He is remembered by family and friends for his love of laughter and his appreciation of life; his final words were “thank you.”

Philip is survived by his wife, Sharon Rose Smith; son, Gabe Smith (Cindie); daughter, Bryony Smith; grandchildren, Ryan, Andy and Ashley; two great-grandchildren; and brothers, Jim, Tom, and Paul.

A celebration of Phil's life will be held later in the year.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Civil Liberties Union (American Civil Liberties Union).

Notes of condolences may be sent to Sharon Smith, 242 N. East St. #22, Amherst, MA 01002.

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In Memory of . . . Robert M. Hemstreet (1930-2015)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 4, 2015
The Rev. Robert “Bob” Merrill Hemstreet died on February 11, 2015, at the age of 84.

Bob was born to Albert B. Hemstreet and Beatrice Merrill Hemstreet on May 25, 1930 in Rochester, N.Y. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from New York University in 1952. Bob was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1953, and he served until 1955, at which point he was honorably discharged. He went on to study at Crane Theological School at Tufts University, and graduated with a Master of Divinity in 1964.

Rev. Hemstreet was ordained by the First Unitarian Church at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in 1964, and served as minister to the First Unitarian Church from 1964 to 1968. From 1969 to 1972, he served as Minister-at-Large to the Greater Wilmington Council of Unitarian Universalist Societies, ministering half time to fellowships in West Chester, PA and Newark, DE. He next served as full time minister to the Unitarian Fellowship of Newark, DE from 1972 to 1975, and as weekend minister in York, PA from 1973 to 1974. He went on to serve as minister to the UU Church of Flushing, NY from 1976 to 1995; and was elected Minister Emeritus from UU Church of Flushing in 1999, a title he held until his death.

Rev. Hemstreet was devoted to, and active within, the denomination. Following the 1961 merger of Unitarianism and Universalism, he pushed for the adoption of a set of purposes and principles as a unifying guide that all congregations could affirm and promote. Throughout his ministry, he engaged with the faith in varying capacities - he served as president of three Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association chapters (St. Lawrence, Joseph Priestley and Metro NY); board member of the New York Metro District; trustee of the St. Lawrence Foundation for Theological Education from 1979 to 1985; member of a Flushing interfaith clergy group; and founder and elected president of Unitarian Universalists for Socialism in 1988. Bob strongly identified as a UU Humanist, and wrote extensively about Humanism as a religious path. He famously created the Thanksgiving Cider and Cornbread Communion, a service that has been widely anthologized and is now an annual feature of many UU congregations across the continent. He loved Star Island, and was an enthusiastic participant in the annual Institute for Religion in an Age of Science conference.

Dedicated to bettering his community and the world at large, Bob was very active in the IARF. He held the position of IARF American Chapter President from 1981 to 1984, and traveled to Europe several times for IARF related events. Bob got his start in the anti-racist and socialist movements in his mid-teens, as a follower of C.L.R. James, an activist and author from Trinidad and Tobago. He remained an activist on behalf of the disenfranchised his whole life. When the call went out to go down to Selma, Alabama after James Reeb's murder, Bob knew he needed to go. A former congregant of Bob’s felt it was so important for him to travel to Selma that he emptied the cash register in the store he owned, and gave Bob the $300. Bob answered the call.

Closer to home, he co-founded the original Queens Amnesty International chapter during the late 1970's; and served on the boards of the Queens Historical Society, the Queens Council of Churches, and the Queens Network for Intergroup Harmony.

Bob was introduced quite early in life to religion and ministry. As a child, he was mentored by an Episcopal priest, and served as an altar boy in the Episcopal Church; additionally, Bob’s grandfather served as an Episcopal priest to the deaf. Bob’s childhood home was located in Canton, NY near St. Lawrence University Theological School, and his grandmother rented out rooms to theology students. Ever curious and eager to learn, Bob spent many nights with his ear pressed against a bedroom door, intently listening to the students’ theological discussions.

Bob’s interests were deeply embedded in his work; he found joy within social justice work and preaching. Very much the intellectual, he was an avid article clipper, and appreciated reading, writing and music. His loving wife, Wendy, remembers Bob as one who was “always searching,” even in his final days.

He is survived by his wife, Wendy Moscow, and his stepsister, Gail Fiorelli.

A memorial service will be held on March 21st at 4:00 P.M., at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Queens, in Flushing, NY.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, 689 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-3302 (http://www.uusc.org/).

Notes of condolences may be sent to Wendy Moscow, 25-18 Union Street, #5E, Flushing, NY 11354.

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In Memory of . . . Stanley Aronson (1933-2015)

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 19, 2015
The Rev. Stanley Aronson died on January 12, 2015, at the age of 81.

Stanley was born on June 5, 1933 to Abraham and Tillie Aronson. He attended Temple University, and graduated with a Doctor of Podiatry in 1958. He served in the United States Army Medical Service Corps from 1959 to 1962; then worked as a podiatrist and a disc jockey before entering seminary. He graduated with a Master of Divinity from Starr King School for the Ministry in 1982.

Rev. Aronson was ordained to the ministry in 1982 by the First Unitarian Church of Berkeley, CA (now the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley in Kensington, CA). He was first called to serve as Interim Minister to the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto, and he served there for one year. From 1982 to 1985, he served as extension minister to the Unitarian Fellowship of Houston, TX, the Bay Area Unitarian Fellowship of Houston, TX, and the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Galveston County, TX. He then served as Urban Extension Minister to the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Detroit, MI from 1985 to 1988; Interim Minister to the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany, NY from 1988 to 1989; Interim Minister to the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Centre County of State College, PA, from 1989 to 1990; and Minister to the Unitarian Universalist Society of Stamford, CT from 1990 to 1999. He was elected Minister Emeritus to the Unitarian Universalist Society of Stamford, CT in 1999.

Rev. Aronson served in various denominational and community organizations. His involvement included, but was not limited to, serving as Co-Chair of the Urban Church Coalition of the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA); Co-Chair of the Unitarian Universalist District of Michigan (UUDOM) Extension Committee; and Good Offices Person and Chapter President of the UUDOM-Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association. He also served as Board Member of the Michigan Coalition for Human Rights; Member of the Interfaith Conference on Liberal Religion; Board Member of the Pacific House Shelter for the Homeless; Vice President of the Council on Churches/Synagogues; Committee Member of the Interfaith AIDS Advisory Committee; and Founding Member of the Interfaith Dialogue Task Force

Stanley had a wide range of interests, including writing, music, exercising, and film. A Harley Davidson enthusiast, he rode his Harley coast to coast, from Berkeley, California to Toronto, Canada during the late 1970’s, a journey that took almost a month to complete. He loved the New York Times crossword puzzles and would often be able to complete the Sunday editions. Stanley was very social, and according to his son, Brad, “died having had more friends than most could only dream of having.”

Stanley’s son, Brad, remembers his father as an “empathetic person” with a “great sense of humor.” Brad is proud of his father’s counseling skills, and his ability to listen and guide without passing judgment. “He was a very giving and generous father,” said Brad, “and he was always there for us.”

He is survived by his sons, Greg (Aileen); Kevin (Christina); and Brad (Joey); grandchildren, Sean and Ryan; and great grandchildren, Christian, Alexis, Gracie, and Preston.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Brad Aronson, 1262 Truchard Lane, Lincoln, CA 95648.

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In Memory of . . . Roberta M. "Bobbie" Nelson (1935-2015)

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 19, 2015
The Rev. Dr. Roberta M. “Bobbie” Nelson died on January 2, 2015 at the age of 79.

Bobbie was born on June 9, 1935 to Raymond A. Martin and Vera R. Martin. She graduated from Tufts University, with a Bachelor of Science, in 1958. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Meadville Lombard Theological School in 1996.

Bobbie was certified as an Accredited Director of Religious Education by the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) in 1967. She served as Director of Religious Education to First Parish in Needham, MA from 1959 to 1973, and to Fairfax Unitarian Church of Oakton, VA from 1973 to 1980. She was ordained to the ministry in 1980 by the Fairfax Church, and then served as their Minister of Religious Education from 1980 to 1987. She went on to serve as Minister of Religious Education to Cedar Lane Unitarian Universalist Church of Bethesda, MD from 1987 to 2001, and was named their Minister Emerita in 2002.

Rev. Nelson stayed engaged with the denomination at large throughout the entirety of her career, and was involved in groundbreaking projects. She was active within the Liberal Religious Educators Association (LREDA), and served as Secretary, Vice-President and President. She chaired the Sexuality Education Task Force, a former project of the UUA and United Church of Christ (UCC), and served on the UUA and Meadville Lombard joint Envisioning Committee concerning the Transition of the Independent Study Program (ISP) from the UUA to Meadville Lombard, and the establishment of the Sophia Lyon Fahs Center at Meadville Lombard. She was an advisor to candidates in the ISP and Modified Residency Program from 1971 to 2008. She served on a myriad of UUA committees, and served on the Board of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association (UUMA) and as vice president from 2001 to 2004.

Rev. Nelson was a major interpreter and trainer of the UUA’s About Your Sexuality (AYS) Program, and led countless AYS teacher training workshops. The program was launched in 1971, and was run by Unitarian Universalist congregations for over 25 years. With her husband, Chris Nelson, Bobbie coauthored the curricula, Parents as Resident Theologians, Parents as Spiritual Guides, and Parents as Social Justice Educators.

Rev. Nelson received the Angus H. MacLean Award for Excellence in Religious Education in 1975; the Larry Axel Award for Teaching Excellence from Meadville Lombard and the Unitarian Universalist Women’s Federation Ministry to Women Award, both in 2001. In 2002, she was selected as the UUMA’s Berry Street Essayist.

Rev. Nelson’s colleagues and family members recall her willingness to speak up for things that she felt strongly about. “She was never afraid or hesitant,” her husband, Chris Nelson, remembers. Bobbie’s commitment to speaking her truth led her to serve as the spokesperson chosen to defend the About Your Sexuality program when it was under attack on the national television segment, Public Eye with Bryant Gumbel. Former colleague Judith A. Frediani writes, ‘For forty years, when Unitarian Universalist religious education needed a voice, Bobbie spoke out. Whenever leadership was called for, Bobbie was called.”

Bobbie enjoyed traveling, reading, cooking, and entertaining. Post-retirement, she volunteered at an elementary school and treasured the hours she spent with first and second graders.

"A wink or a hint of a smile became her last words but love, courage, and faith sustained her to the end. She died at peace," said her husband, Chris Nelson.

Bobbie is survived by her husband of 54 years, Christopher “Chris” B. Nelson; daughters, Heather Nelson, Joy Saams (John), and Jennifer Nelson; grandchildren Jack, James, and Julia Saams; and brother, Donald A. Martin (Jean).

A memorial service was held at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Ellsworth, ME, at 2:00 PM on Saturday, January 10. Another service will be held at Cedar Lane Unitarian Universalist Church in Bethesda, MD, on Saturday, April 25th at 1 PM.

In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory can be made to: Roberta Nelson Prize for Excellence in Religious Education at Meadville Lombard Theological School, 610 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603 or to The Star Island Corporation Morton-Benedict House, 30 Middle St., Portsmouth, NH 03801

Notes of condolences may be sent to the family at 41 Astbury Lane, Sedgwick, ME 04676-3423.

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In Memory of . . . Albert H. Thelander (1925- 2014)

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 9, 2014
The Rev. Albert “Al” Hill Thelander died on October 20, 2014, at the age of 89.

Al was born on August 8, 1925 to Margaret and Albert Levi Thelander. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science from Harvard University in 1949, and went on to serve the United States Air Force from 1952 to 1970. He then graduated from Starr King School for the Ministry in 1973.

Rev. Thelander was ordained at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Saddleback Valley of Laguna Hills, CA, (now Tapestry, A Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Mission Viejo, CA) in 1977, and served as minister to the church from 1977 to 1979. He was called to serve as minister to the Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Bayside, CA in 1979. He served Humboldt until his retirement in 1993, at which point he was voted Minister Emeritus.

Rev. Thelander was deeply committed to the denomination. He served as founding member and secretary of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Cooperative, Pacific Central District of the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) from 1975 to 1977; Northern California area coordinator to the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee from 1975 to 1976; chair of the denominational affairs and communications committee of the Pacific Southwest District of the UUA from 1978 to 1979; Board of Directors of the Pacific Central District from 1983 to 1987; and President of the Pacific Central District from 1985 to 1987.

Al was interested in chess, carpentry, reading, and spending time with family. He was affectionately called GrandAl, by his family. Al’s granddaughter, Emmy, remembers, “GrandAl approached everything in life, including the whimsical and the grave, with the assumption that it was--or could be--meaningful. He was and is a model for intentional living.”

Albert is survived by his wife of 63 years, Mary; children, Carl Thelander (Billy Thelander), Margo Thelander (Don Matthews), and Kate Alvarez (Paul Alvarez); grandchildren, Emmy, Max, Alicia, Alex, Cara and Shane; and great-grandchildren, Davin, Anderson, and Collin.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date.

Notes of condolences may be sent to Mary Thelander, 12833 Lake Wildwood Drive, Penn Valley, CA 95946.

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In Memory of . . . Lee Devoe Greiner (1959-2014)

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The Rev. Lee Devoe Greiner died on October 18, 2014 at the age of 55.

Lee was born on May 29, 1959 to Arthur and Ann Greiner. She graduated from Middlebury College, with a Bachelor of Arts degree, in 1991, and from the Pacific School of Religion, with a Master of Divinity Degree, in 1995.

Rev. Devoe Greiner was ordained by the Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society of Middlebury, VT, in 1996. She was called as the first full-time minister to the Unitarian Universalist Church of Idaho Falls, ID, in 1996, and she served the congregation until 2004. She went on to serve as associate minister to the First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa from 2005 to 2006; interim minister to the Unitarian Universalist Community Church of Augusta, ME from 2006 to 2009; interim minister to All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church of Kansas City, MO from 2009 to 2010; and interim minister to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Upper Valley of Norwich, VT from 2011 to 2013.

Rev. Devoe Greiner served the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association (UUMA) as a Chapter Leader to the Northeast UUMA Chapter from 2007 to 2009. She helped the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) develop its policy on ethical eating and humane treatment of animals, and was active in regional ministerial groups and the Interim Ministers’ Guild.

Lee treasured both the earth and its people. She spent the last few years of her life living on a home atop Bethel Mountain, VT, with grounds covered in flowers, fruits and vegetables - she found joy in tending to the land. Her daughter, Eliza, lived with her throughout the past two years, and her other daughter, Jamaica, and her family lived close by. Lee was a loving and devoted mother and relished the time she spent with her children and grandson.

Lee was a lifelong learner and kept a vast library of books on religion, spirituality, and travel. Her sense of adventure and purpose led her to study Arabic in Morocco, Sufism in Turkey, and teach at a camp for war-traumatized children from the former Yugoslavia.

UUA Transitions Director, Rev. Keith Kron, writes:

“On a more personal note, Lee was also my dear friend. We could not get together without much laughter, stimulating conversation, and deep affection. She had an infectious gift for loving life, making the most of a situation, and being able to see what possibilities might be ahead. She passed this onto me and countless others…. I always looked forward to our time together, even when life was hard. That was because Lee was, what every good minister strives to be, a source of hope.”

 

She is survived by her three children, Jamaica Burns Griffin (Ferron), Ben Burns (Jennifer) and Eliza Burns; grandson, Skye Devoe Griffin; mother, Ann Brousseau; sisters, Michael Ann Greiner (Jim Muller) and Mary Conlon (Peter); and stepmother, Joan Greiner.

A memorial service was held at 5:00 P.M on November 7th, at the Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, 2 Duane Court (at Charles Avenue), Middlebury, VT 05753.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Unitarians for the Ethical Treatment of Animals at uuam.org, or the Arts Bus Project, c/o Kimball Library, 67 Main St., Randolph, VT 05060 or artsbusvt.org.

Condolences may be sent to Eliza Burns, 171 Campbell Road, Bethel, VT 05032. Online condolences may be left at www.dayfunerals.com.

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In Memory of . . . William A. DeWolfe (1927-2014)

Posted By Administration, Monday, November 24, 2014

The Rev. William A. “Bill” DeWolfe died on October 29, 2014 at the age of 87.

 

Bill was born on August 21, 1927 to John Campbell Gordon DeWolfe and Miriam Elbridge Ford DeWolfe.  Bill served in the United States Army from 1945 to 1947. Succeeding his service, he graduated Tufts College with a Bachelor of Art 1950, Harvard University with a Bachelor in Sacred Theology in 1953, and Springfield College with a Master’s in Education in 1963.

 

Rev. DeWolfe was ordained by The First Universalist Church of Norwell, MA in 1952. He was called to the First Universalist Society of Wakefield, MA in 1953; he served the Wakefield parish until 1955. He went on to serve as minister to First Parish Universalist of Stoughton, MA from 1956 to 1960; to 16 Acres Unitarian Universalist Church of Springfield, MA from 1960 to 1964; to First Unitarian Church of San Antonio, TX from 1964 to 1970; and to First Unitarian Church of St. Louis, MO from 1970 to 1973. Following his parish ministries, Bill served as Interdistrict Representative to the Eastern Great Lakes Area of the UUA from 1973 to 1985, and District Representative to the Central Massachusetts and Connecticut Valley Districts of the UUA from 1986 to 1992.

 

Heavily invested in the denomination, Rev. DeWolfe worked as a crew member, staff member and institute leader at Ferry Beach, Star Island, Rowe, and Lake Murray, Oklahoma and Ohio-Meadville Summer Institutes. He held memberships in the Fraters of the Wayside Inn; the Cedar Hill Study Group; the Executive Board of the Northern New England Unitarian Universalist District; the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association (UUMA) and the Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association, in which he served a term as president.  He served as president of the Universalist Historical Society from 1958 to 1964; founded the Eastern Great Lakes Leadership School; and served as board member and founder of the Connecticut Valley District of the Unitarian Universalist Association (merged with the Central Mass District in 2000 to form The Clara Barton District).

 

Bill advocated for civil action and justice. He served as a Rotarian in Stoughton and Springfield, MA; San Antonio, TX; and St. Louis, MO.  He was instrumental in the founding of the Texas American Civil Liberties Union; and served on its national board of directors. Additionally, he was very active in Planned Parenthood.

 

Bill enjoyed spending time with his children and grandchildren; following sports, particularly the Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins; and traveling. His wife, Barbara, fondly remembers camping throughout the United States with Bill and their young children. 

 

“Bill was a wonderful husband and father,” his wife, Barbara, explains. “One of the things I appreciated about Bill was that even in the days before women’s lib, he was always urging me to follow my career as much as I wanted to. He would readily take care of the kids while I went off to work.”

 

Bill is survived by his wife, Barbara DeWolfe; sons, Richard DeWolfe (Hillary Colt) and Paul DeWolfe (Ellen Sherwood DeWolfe); grandchildren, Reid DeWolfe, Jack DeWolfe , Abby DeWolfe (Seth Patch), and Emily DeWolfe; and great grandchildren, Sebastian and Madeline. He is predeceased by son Rev. Mark Mosher DeWolfe.

 

A memorial service will be held on November 21st at 2 P.M. at the Unitarian Universalist Community Church of Augusta, Maine, 69 Winthrop Street, PO Box 8, Augusta, ME 04330.

 

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to Ferry Beach Park Association, 5 Morris Ave. Saco, ME 04072 or to Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association, C/O Joel Weaver, Treasurer, 535 Gradyville Rd. Unit V212, Newtown Square, PA 19073. If donating to Unitarian Universalist Retired Ministers and Partners Association (UURMaPA),  please make checks payable to "UURMaPA" and include "Bill DeWolfe" on the memo line.

 

Notes of condolences may be sent to Barbara DeWolfe, 4 Hickory Lane, Augusta, ME, 04330.  

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In Memory of . . . Theodore Albert Webb (1918-2014)

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 19, 2014

The Rev. Theodore “Ted” A. Webb died on October 6, 2014, at the age of 96.

 

Ted was born on August 23, 1918, to Harold Webb and Annie Cushman Webb. He graduated from the University of Maine with a Bachelor of Arts in 1948, and from Bangor Theological Seminary with a Bachelor of Divinity in 1956.

 

Rev. Webb was ordained by the First Universalist Church of Stafford, CT, in 1946. He served as minister to the First Universalist Church of Stafford, CT, from 1944 to 1947; First Universalist Church of Canton, NY (now the Unitarian Universalist Church of Canton, NY), from 1951 to 1956; and Universalist Unitarian Church of Haverhill, MA, from 1957 to 1962. He then served as the first Executive Director of the Massachusetts Bay District of the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) from 1962 to 1970. He went on to serve as minister to the UU Society of Sacramento, CA, from 1971 to 1983, and was voted Minister Emeritus in 1985. From 1985 to 1990, Rev. Webb served interim ministries in Iowa City, IA; Baltimore, MD; Minneapolis, MN; and Atlanta, GA.  

 

Rev. Webb was committed to the denomination at large. He served many years on the UUA Program Committee, and served as President and Board Member of the Pacific Central District of the UUA. He founded the Board of Trustees of Renaissance West in The Pacific Central District of the UUA, and founded and edited the Connecticut Universalist. While serving UU Sacramento, he spearheaded a program of lectures by local intellectuals, government officials and religious leaders, called the Forum.

 

Rev. Webb promoted peace, justice and compassion. In the 1950s, he provided sanctuary in his home to demonstrators opposing U.S. nuclear arms in the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and in 1965, he traveled to Selma, Alabama, for a weeklong peace vigil following the death of James Reeb. Later in life, Rev. Webb served as president and board member of the Sacramento chapter of United Nations Association, and in 1988, he received a distinguished life achievement award from California State University, Sacramento.

 

Ted spent much of his free time researching the lives of the Washburn family. The Washburns were a politically involved group in the 19th century, and among the first Universalists. After retiring, Ted Webb wrote two books about the family, Seven Sons: Millionaires and Vagabonds (Trafford Publishing, 1999) and Impassioned Brothers: Ministers Resident to France and Paraguay (University Press of America, 2002).

 

Ted was a worldwide traveler, and shared the interest with his daughter, Christine. He was also an avid reader, and a great communicator. He enjoyed conversing about politics and current events, and he hosted a series of such conversations in his living room. Because of the group’s increasing size, it was relocated to UU Sacramento, and much to Ted’s embarrassment, was lovingly dubbed “Ted’s Web.”

 

Of her father, daughter Christine Webb-Curtis remembers, “He walked the talk. But he rarely expressed his own personal convictions from the pulpit. He never wanted to impose himself on others in terms of their spiritual beliefs.”

 

Ted is survived by his daughters, Bobbie Webb (Dave Sledge) and Christine Webb-Curtis (Phillip Webb-Curtis); sons, Theodore Ford Webb (Jeannie Ford Webb) and Noel Webb (Sharon Webb); grandchildren, Rob Gilbert, Renee Cahill, Randy Gilbert, Seth Forester, Patrick Curtis, Sam Curtis, Justin Codinha, Tucker Ford Webb, Parker Ford Webb, Jessica Webb, Alexandra Webb; six great grandchildren; and one great-great grandchild, Penelope, born on Ted’s 96th birthday.

 

A memorial service will be held on December 13, 2014, at the Unitarian Universalist Society of Sacramento’s temporary location for services, Sierra Arden United Church of Christ, 890 Morse Ave., Sacramento, CA 95864.

 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Unitarian Universalist Society of Sacramento, 2425 Sierra Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95825.

 

Notes of condolences may be sent to The Family of Ted Webb, 1137 Amberwood Road, Sacramento, CA 95864.

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